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Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
03-06-2019, 09:29 PM (This post was last modified: 03-06-2019 09:46 PM by Rogier.)
Post: #101
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
(03-02-2019 05:31 PM)ijabbott Wrote:  
(03-02-2019 01:15 PM)Maximilian Hohmann Wrote:  Now the cassette players of the time had non-linear tape counters. There was no 1:1 relation between the playing time of the music and the counter.

AFAIK, the compact cassette has a constant tape speed of 1+7/8 in/s (4.7625 cm/s) so the tape counter ought to be geared from that. But the linear relationship between time and change in counter value would reasonably vary between models.

The relationship between counter value and time was definitely non-linear. I programmed my HP11 tot convert between the two. For converting counter value to time I had to add a sinus-like function (doing one cycle per side-length 45 minutes) to a straight line. If anyone is interested I'll post it. Particularly useful for owners of a working early '80s Philips cassette player.

Some other non-math applications:
* games; Mastermind, Mahjong-scores (both posted), Blackjack.
* dice (like many others)
* medical calculations:
- multiple category-counter (for counting white bloodcells by type)
- expected lung volumes for a given sex, age & height,
- blood-gas analysis
- body surface area
- glomerular filtration rate (eGFR/MDRD)

HP 33E, HP 11C, HP 48 SX, HP 35S
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03-07-2019, 01:08 PM (This post was last modified: 03-08-2019 06:34 AM by Gamo.)
Post: #102
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
I use my calculator to generate lottery quick-pick numbers.

Using a quick and easy to remember program but in order to use

this it is math related at first in order to use it in program.

for HP-12C or 12CP to generate 6 digits randomly.

Procedure:

0 < seed < 1 [R/S] display xxx,xxx

Program: RPN mode
Code:

e^x 
ENTER
x
FRAC
ENTER
ENTER
899,999
x
EEX 5
+
INTG
R/S
Rv
GTO 01

Program: ALG mode
Code:

[e^x] [x²] [FRAC] [x] 1 [=]
[LSTx] [x] 899,999 [+] [EEX] 5 [=] [INTG]
[R/S] [X<>Y] [GTO] 001

Gamo
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03-08-2019, 08:30 PM
Post: #103
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
(03-07-2019 01:08 PM)Gamo Wrote:  I use my calculator to generate lottery quick-pick numbers.
...
Code:
...
899,999
x
...

The two programs generate numbers between 100000 and 999998.
Is this what you intended?

I don't know anything about this lottery, but if you want six-digit random numbers up to 999999 you have to replace this 899999 with 900000, i.e. 9 E5.

Dieter
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03-09-2019, 11:07 PM
Post: #104
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
Have you used your watch for something that was not really timing related?

Oh, yes Smile





Csaba
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03-10-2019, 12:42 AM
Post: #105
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
(03-09-2019 11:07 PM)Csaba Tizedes Wrote:  Have you used your watch for something that was not really timing related?

Oh, yes Smile





Csaba

This is the same principle that an aircraft reads indicated air speed through pitot tubes.

By the way, I didn't know that this Casio has that wonderfull display contrast...I really don't like non programmable calculators, but now I have a crush in this one...hmmmm This is C.A.S......
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03-10-2019, 09:36 AM
Post: #106
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
I've really enjoyed the displays on my 82MS, 82TL and 9750gII. They're (at least in my opinion) much nicer to view than the slightly blue LCD of the 9750g+. I also like the shapes of the characters on the lower LCD for the 82 series, though that could just be a case of not having used anything else here where I live. No TI to be seen here.

(Post 327)

Regards, BrickViking
HP-50g |Casio fx-9750G+ |Casio fx-9750GII (SH4a)
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03-10-2019, 05:00 PM
Post: #107
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
(03-09-2019 11:07 PM)Csaba Tizedes Wrote:  Have you used your watch for something that was not really timing related?

It is sort of OT but I use my digital clock as random source (if I don't look at it too often). For example getting 0 or 1. If the seconds are between 0 and 4, it means 0, otherwise it means 1.

It is pretty nice when cycling / walking through a city to explore in a random way. Although sometimes I need to add rules to avoid going back on the same route, or when there are more than 2 directions.

Wikis are great, Contribute :)
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04-12-2019, 12:55 AM (This post was last modified: 04-12-2019 12:57 AM by freelanzr.)
Post: #108
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
This is a great thread topic, with some really interesting use cases.

The very first HP Prime program I ever wrote was a Roll Dice program specifically for the game of Risk, since we had lost some of the Die.

Of course, it would query for Attacker and Defender # of die to roll, and then output the roll results and lost armies for each side.

I added a counter for tracking Attack/Defense win ratio and percentage.
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04-12-2019, 02:17 AM (This post was last modified: 04-13-2019 05:35 AM by Valentin Albillo.)
Post: #109
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
.
Hi, pier4r:

Quote:Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?

For assorted HP RPN calculators (HP-25, HP-12C, HP-67, HP-41C and HP-71B), apart from dice, games (all types, including adventure-like, word games, board games such as Checkers, Minichess, Othello and even a "Scrambler"-type graphic one), simulations (Life, random walks, mazes, genetic algorithms, a cross-compiler, etc.) and all that (including my Modest Mater and Sudoku Solver programs), I also wrote an ELIZA-like conversational HP-71B program which of course has nothing to do with math, it's all logic, pattern recognition, some heuristics and lotsa lotsa text handling. Limited (mainly because of limited RAM) but fun.

Another "not really math related" HP-71B program I wrote was one to create arbitrary text 3D stereograms, viewable either in a physical or emulated HP-IL monitor or by printing them to paper. If interested, it's included in my PDF article Long Live the HP-71B !. Enjoy Smile

Best regards.
V.
.

  
Find All My HP-related Materials here:  Valentin Albillo's HP Collection
 
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04-14-2019, 03:04 PM
Post: #110
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
This guy have


https://youtu.be/5Qf9ADP5Tis
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04-20-2019, 11:03 AM
Post: #111
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
(03-04-2019 03:53 PM)EugeneNine Wrote:  Is that similar to the old GPIB (I think that was the name), it looked like a narrow centronics connector.

HP-IB: Not just IEEE-488, but the hardware, documentation and support that delivers the shortest path to a measurement system.

:-)

**vp
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04-20-2019, 12:13 PM (This post was last modified: 04-20-2019 12:14 PM by Sylvain Cote.)
Post: #112
RE: Have you used your calculator for something that was not really math related?
(04-20-2019 11:03 AM)vassilisprevelakis Wrote:  
(03-04-2019 03:53 PM)EugeneNine Wrote:  Is that similar to the old GPIB (I think that was the name), it looked like a narrow centronics connector.

HP-IB: Not just IEEE-488, but the hardware, documentation and support that delivers the shortest path to a measurement system.

Chronology of the HP-IB evolution:
  • Sept. '65 — HP began to look at how to standardize "the interfacing of all HP future instruments."
  • March '72 — U.S. Advisory Committee (IEC) formed. The committee takes HP proposal as starting point.
  • Sept. '74 — IEC approves for ballot draft document (U.S. Proposal).
  • April '75 — IEEE Publishes IEEE-488.
  • Jan. '76 — ANSI Publishes MC1.1.
  • Nov. '78 — IEEE Revises IEEE-488.
  • June '80 — IEC 625-1 published.
  • Dec. '81 — IEEE 728 published. (Recommended Codes & Formats)
  • June '87 — IEEE revises 488 to become 488.1.
  • June '87 — IEEE 488.2 published. (Codes, Formats, Protocols & Commands)
IEEE-488 branding: HP-IB, GPIB, IEEE BUS, ASCII BUS, PLUS BUS & IEC BUS


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