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TI-36x PRO Equivalent
05-06-2017, 05:16 PM (This post was last modified: 05-07-2017 06:00 PM by Chris..)
Post: #1
TI-36x PRO Equivalent
Does HP make a SCIENTIFIC Calculator with a similar display and features as the TI-36x PRO?
One feature I want is the outputs to display as simplified values.

For example Sqrt(5^2+6^2) = Sqrt(61) not 7.8102....
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05-06-2017, 08:49 PM
Post: #2
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
as far as I know you need the CAS for that, so 49g+, 50g and Prime (and maybe some model before with additional libraries IIRC).

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05-07-2017, 01:59 AM (This post was last modified: 05-07-2017 05:59 PM by Chris..)
Post: #3
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
I Don't actually mean CAS capability on a scientific calculator. I mean that: Entering the square root of 5 squared plus 6 squared would return Sqrt(61) instead of the decimal approximation.

some more examples are entering 65/4 would return 65/4 or entering 200/400 would return 1/2 and not 0.5.

If there is a proper name for that feature would anyone state it please?

Is the hp 300s+ the ti-36x pro or is it another calculator. Both have the multiview
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05-07-2017, 06:29 AM
Post: #4
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
What you ask is done by the exact mode on the 50g, and it is using part of the case engine as far as I know. I don't think that system without a small Cas engine can do it on the hp side but here there are more experts so let's wait their suggestions.

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05-07-2017, 08:16 AM
Post: #5
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
I would never trust a calculator giving Sqrt(5^2+6^2) = Sqrt(64)

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05-07-2017, 05:23 PM
Post: #6
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
QPI
http://www.hpmuseum.org/software/qpi/42sqpi.htm
can simulate this function on a HP42S
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05-07-2017, 06:03 PM
Post: #7
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
I meant 61 where I put "64" in sqrt(64) answers, I fixed in edit.
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05-07-2017, 10:40 PM
Post: #8
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
+1 for QPI, although I have only used it on the 48G family
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05-07-2017, 11:13 PM
Post: #9
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
(05-06-2017 05:16 PM)Chris. Wrote:  Does HP make a SCIENTIFIC Calculator with a similar display and features as the TI-36x PRO?
One feature I want is the outputs to display as simplified values.

For example Sqrt(5^2+6^2) = Sqrt(61) not 7.8102....

Yes, the 300s+ does this.

No, you don't need a CAS calculator for this. Many modern high end scientific calculators have a display mode that will attempt to display answers more accurately e.g. as fractions or surds (usually a button to change to floating point or a mode to always give floating point answers).


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05-08-2017, 07:27 AM
Post: #10
RE: TI-36x PRO Equivalent
(05-07-2017 05:23 PM)Dani R. Wrote:  QPI
http://www.hpmuseum.org/software/qpi/42sqpi.htm
can simulate this function on a HP42S

(05-07-2017 10:40 PM)thomasross Wrote:  +1 for QPI, although I have only used it on the 48G family

I think a program like QPI is not what the OP is looking for. QPI tries to approximate a given number by a fraction or a term with logs and roots. This can be misleading. For instance, when set to 6 digit precision such a program may return "pi" even if the result of a calculation is simply 355/113 – and vice versa. The idea is not to have a number and then find a "nice" representation for it, but to display the exact result of a calculation (which can then be evaluated as a decimal approximation).

Also consider that QPI would return the result of √(3²+4²) simply as "5" and not as √25. ;-)

Dieter
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