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06-23-2018, 04:49 PM (This post was last modified: 06-23-2018 05:01 PM by Thomas Okken.)
Post: #41
RE: challenge
(06-23-2018 12:45 PM)Massimo Gnerucci Wrote:  
(06-23-2018 10:48 AM)grsbanks Wrote:  No. We would only say that if we saw the fraction \(4\frac{3}{10}\)

I would translate it to \(\frac{12}{10}\). Shouldn't it be \(4 + \frac{3}{10}\)?

Does saying two numbers right after each other imply multiplication in Italian? Big Grin

Fractions can cause interesting ambiguities in spoken Dutch, too:

100 \(\frac{10}{25}\)
honderd tien vijfentwintigste
(one hundred, ten twenty-fifths)

\(\frac{110}{25}\)
honderdtien vijfentwintigste
(one hundred and ten twenty-fifths)

The only difference between the spoken versions of those two numbers is in their intonation.

3 \(\frac{7}{10}\)
drie zeven tiende
(three, seven tenths)

\(\frac{3}{17}\)
drie zeventiende
(three seventeenths)

etc.
Note that we never use "en" ("and") when saying numbers. Well, some people do, but they all seem to be from the pre-WWII generation... (*)

Needless to say, people don't use fractions unless they're very simple ones, like one and a half kilos of apples, that sort of thing. In school we were taught only the straightforward "pi equals three point one four one five nine" style of pronouncing decimal numbers.

(*) EDIT: With a few exceptions, e.g. 2 \(\frac{1}{2}\) is "twee en een half." I think it's because the unstressed "een" would otherwise mess up the rhythm of that phrase, but I admit I need to think about it, it's a bit more complicated than I thought.
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06-23-2018, 06:41 PM
Post: #42
RE: challenge
(06-23-2018 04:49 PM)Thomas Okken Wrote:  
(06-23-2018 12:45 PM)Massimo Gnerucci Wrote:  I would translate it to \(\frac{12}{10}\). Shouldn't it be \(4 + \frac{3}{10}\)?

Does saying two numbers right after each other imply multiplication in Italian? :D

No, that's what I would infer when reading those numbers...

(06-23-2018 04:49 PM)Thomas Okken Wrote:  Needless to say, people don't use fractions unless they're very simple ones, like one and a half kilos of apples, that sort of thing. In school we were taught only the straightforward "pi equals three point one four one five nine" style of pronouncing decimal numbers.

(*) EDIT: With a few exceptions, e.g. 2 \(\frac{1}{2}\) is "twee en een half." I think it's because the unstressed "een" would otherwise mess up the rhythm of that phrase, but I admit I need to think about it, it's a bit more complicated than I thought.

We use fractions more or less in the same way. Usually not more than quarters (in time keeping, usually). Never use things like \(\frac{3}{8}\) in common language.
I think it all relates to the use of imperial units: I don't understand all the emphasis on calculators (back to usual topics, somehow) handling fractions: not so needed here.

Oh, and 2 \(\frac{1}{2}\) is "due e mezzo".

Greetings,
    Massimo

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06-23-2018, 07:38 PM
Post: #43
RE: challenge
(06-23-2018 12:45 PM)Massimo Gnerucci Wrote:  I would translate it to \(\frac{12}{10}\). Shouldn't it be \(4 + \frac{3}{10}\)?

\(\frac{12}{10}\) would be correct if it was written \(4\times\frac{3}{10}\)

One of the quirks of us Brits is our love of mixed fractions. We see them everywhere from recipes (use \(1\frac{1}{2}\)lbs of flour) to road signs (motorway junction in \(1\frac{1}{2}\)miles).
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06-23-2018, 08:42 PM (This post was last modified: 06-23-2018 08:44 PM by Massimo Gnerucci.)
Post: #44
RE: challenge
(06-23-2018 07:38 PM)grsbanks Wrote:  
(06-23-2018 12:45 PM)Massimo Gnerucci Wrote:  I would translate it to \(\frac{12}{10}\). Shouldn't it be \(4 + \frac{3}{10}\)?

\(\frac{12}{10}\) would be correct if it was written \(4\times\frac{3}{10}\)

One of the quirks of us Brits is our love of mixed fractions. We see them everywhere from recipes (use \(1\frac{1}{2}\)lbs of flour) to road signs (motorway junction in \(1\frac{1}{2}\)miles).

Umpf. Mixed fractions. Not widely in use here: 600 g of flour, motorway junction in 1500 m (or 1,5 km)...
To each his own.

Anyway 4 3/10 is ambiguous: Wolfram Alpha suggests possible intepretations as: a date, a mixed fraction and a product. :)

Greetings,
    Massimo

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