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Load a Photo Yes/No?
09-05-2014, 12:04 AM (This post was last modified: 09-05-2014 12:04 AM by eried.)
Post: #21
RE: Load a Photo Yes/No?
Just my 2 cents, if you installed primecomm, tap [AltGr] + [ . ]

Tongue that's the same catalog that is in the Prime (which is certainly pretty much 99% complete in english) but with a quick search... not sure how is that incomplete for you

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09-05-2014, 04:10 AM (This post was last modified: 09-05-2014 04:12 AM by Tim Wessman.)
Post: #22
RE: Load a Photo Yes/No?
(09-04-2014 08:56 PM)Richard Wagner Wrote:  My review of HP Prime, take two:

Under UNITS / (G) Angle, I get a peculiar menu:
1 tr ;; time resolved angular displacement? Or what is this?

Turn, 2pi.

Quote:gon = gradian = grad, yes? Is gon and grad identical then?

Yes. I was never able to tell why bernard included them both in the CAS. To keep things consistent we followed that.

Quote:mils-angle is used in highly advanced military and astronomical, and even radio tracking, work, of extreme precision, and other uses.

I don't beleive that unit exists on the 48 series, or any other previous calculator. Hence my confusion regarding the "missing" units.

Quote: to be allowed to go into Programming,
set Graphics Screen, have access to graphic drawing primitives (line, circle, point), and be expected to use any data type supported by the Calculator, Lists, Matrices, Units, Constants all included of course. Work our own formulas/algorithms, and then apply those fantastic mathematical routines we have access to in Numerical-and/or-CAS modes to that user-Program-generated data!

You still have me confused. There are no missing drawing primitives. They are all in the catalog. You can use them in any location. It is true that you do not have the concept of 2 separate drawing locations like in the 48 series, but that shouldn't stop you from being able to draw anything you desire.

HOWEVER, they do not have a generic menu in which they appear outside the programming environment. In the dedicated program editor they are much easier to access since that is primarily where they will be getting used in creating programs. This is primarily because there IS a specific programming location that is specialized to enable better program creation. Tools such as auto-indentation, keyword highlighting, line numbering, etc can be added there to make it even better.

Maybe you should give a specific example of what you believe is blocked right now, and I can either confirm that it is, or else provide some options on how to do it.

TW

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09-05-2014, 09:19 AM
Post: #23
RE: Load a Photo Yes/No?
Just kicking up a little dust to see where it lands....

I encountered angular-mils in a mathematical reference books many years ago, and was curious if it ever actually surfaced, except for very specialized use?

As far as other comments regarding Catalog, etc.:
Its just my way of gaining my familiarity with this new HP Prime, raise a little dust, and see where it lands. It's an impressive enough machine; I just need to wrap my head around it.

Once I start to really find time to dive into creating my own programs, I'll ask for help if I need it.

Apparently as Firmware updates come down, both updated PDF manuals and youtube tutorials also appear, this proves handy if you know about new releases.

'Input' now supports manual-entry of specific data types, and introduction of checkboxes. I just need to get caught up.

IS THERE an online LIBRARY of sample code, programs for HP Prime? I need to get my hands on that and study them.

(09-05-2014 04:10 AM)Tim Wessman Wrote:  [quote='Richard Wagner' pid='18343' dateline='1409864208']
My review of HP Prime, take two:

Under UNITS / (G) Angle, I get a peculiar menu:
1 tr ;; time resolved angular displacement? Or what is this?

Turn, 2pi.

Quote:gon = gradian = grad, yes? Is gon and grad identical then?

Yes. I was never able to tell why bernard included them both in the CAS. To keep things consistent we followed that.

Quote:mils-angle is used in highly advanced military and astronomical, and even radio tracking, work, of extreme precision, and other uses.

I don't beleive that unit exists on the 48 series, or any other previous calculator. Hence my confusion regarding the "missing" units.

<snip>
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09-05-2014, 10:22 AM (This post was last modified: 09-05-2014 10:23 AM by walter b.)
Post: #24
RE: Load a Photo Yes/No?
(09-05-2014 04:10 AM)Tim Wessman Wrote:  
(09-04-2014 08:56 PM)Richard Wagner Wrote:  gon = gradian = grad, yes? Is gon and grad identical then?

Yes. I was never able to tell why bernard included them both in the CAS. To keep things consistent we followed that.

IMHO, only one of them should remain. GRAD is the traditional name of that unit in HP calcs, "gon" is the official one in Europe, "gradian" seems to be in the USA. It isn't SI anyway - but one name should suffice.

(09-05-2014 04:10 AM)Tim Wessman Wrote:  
(09-04-2014 08:56 PM)Richard Wagner Wrote:  mils-angle is used in highly advanced military and astronomical, and even radio tracking, work, of extreme precision, and other uses.

I don't beleive that unit exists on the 48 series, or any other previous calculator. Hence my confusion regarding the "missing" units.

@Richard: Please ... could you refrain from adding more to that heap of outdated stuff? TIA.

d:-/
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09-05-2014, 02:04 PM
Post: #25
RE: Load a Photo Yes/No?
(09-05-2014 09:19 AM)Richard Wagner Wrote:  IS THERE an online LIBRARY of sample code, programs for HP Prime? I need to get my hands on that and study them.

Have you seen the HP Prime Software Library here at MoHPC?

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09-05-2014, 08:37 PM (This post was last modified: 09-05-2014 11:31 PM by Richard Wagner.)
Post: #26
RE: Load a Photo Yes/No?
the following definition(s) is taken from:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angle

Mil (n = 6000–6400)
The mil is any of several units that are approximately equal to a milliradian. There are several definitions ranging from 0.05625 to 0.06 degrees (3.375 to 3.6 minutes), with the milliradian being approximately 0.05729578 degrees (3.43775 minutes). In NATO countries, it is defined as 1/6400th of a circle. Its value is approximately equal to the angle subtended by a width of 1 metre as seen from 1 km away (2π / 6400 = 0.0009817… ≒ 1/1000).

That says more than my expensive math reference books on my shelves ever told me. :-)

That web page also explains Tr and other concepts as well!!
-------------------------------------------------------
and from: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/show...p?t=302538
we have this wonderful revelation:

why does anyone want to divide a right angle into 100 grads instead of 90 degrees?

grads are a decimal unit, and are subdivided into simple 100ths, just like the meter is subdivided into cetimeters..Degrees are not decimal units--they are subdivided into 60 minutes and then another 60 seconds.So every time you want to do a simple calculation (say, adding two angles), you have to do first do TWO extra steps--convert the seconds into decimal minutes, then convert the decimalized minutes into decimal degrees. (most pocket calculators have a simple button that does this, but it still requires you to press an extra button before doing the actual calculation that you want to complete.

try this example--add two angles : 75 degrees, 45 minutes, 20 seconds plus 25 degrees 15 minutes 10 seconds.
or add 75.753 plus 25.251
Which is easier?

Land surveyors (those guys you see on the side of the road with an instrument mounted on a tripod) make hundreds or even thousands of angle measurements during a day's work.

Grads are great!!!
-------------------------------------------------------
and still more evidence Grad is cherished:
http://mathforum.org/library/drmath/view/55451.html

http://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/dictG.html

grad or grade or gon (g or grd)
a unit of angle measurement equal to 1/400 circle, 0.01 right angle,
0.9 degrees, or 54'. This unit was introduced in France, where it is
called the grade, in the early years of the metric system. The grad
is the English version, apparently introduced by engineers around
1900. The name gon is used for this unit in German, Swedish, and
other northern European languages in which the word grad means
degree. Although many calculators will display angle measurements in
grads as well as degrees or radians, it is difficult to find actual
applications of the grad today.

http://jeff560.tripod.com/g.html

GRAD or GRADE originally meant one ninetieth of a right angle, but
the term is now used primarily to refer to one hundredth of a right
angle.

Gradus is a Latin word equivalent to "degree."

Nicole Oresme called the difference between two successive
latitudines a gradus (Smith vol. 2, page 319).

The OED2 shows a use of grade in English in about 1511, referring
to one-ninetieth of a right angle.

The OED2 shows a use of grade, meaning one-hundredth of a right
angle, in 1801 in Dupre Neolog. Fr. Dict. 127: "Grade .. the
grade, or decimal degree of the meridian."

The term may have been used in the modern sense in the unpublished
French Cadastre tables of 1801.

In 1857, Mathematical Dictionary and Cyclopedia of Mathematical
Science has: "The French have proposed to divide the right angle
into 100 equal parts, called grades, but the suggestion has not
been extensively adopted."

Searching for other references, I found these:

NIMA: Datums, Ellipsoids, Grids, and Grid Reference Systems
http://cartome.org/nima-grids.htm

Some foreign produced maps may use the centesimal (decimal) system
of angular measurement (the division of a full circle into 400
grads). A grad (or gon) is divided into 100 centigrade (grad
minutes), and each centigrad into 100 deci-milligrads (grad
seconds).
...
Geographic coordinates are given in terms of angular measurement,
usually in degrees, minutes, and seconds but occasionally in grads.

Gregor Shapiro helped me find this one:

Silva: General Compass InformationReference Systems
http://www.silva.se/outdoor/products/comp_general.htm

Graduation
Normal graduation is 360o. For Scandinavian countries 400 gon
is also used. Military graduation 6400' or 6300' (Sweden).
Often both 360o and 6400' are used, i.e. double graduation.
-------------------------------------------------------
By pasting specific text here, this message is now a complete reference
onto itself of mils and grads. Also, webpages have a notorious history of disappearing eventually.

I vote that 'grad or grads' be RE-INSTATED in HP PRIME!
Let's put it to a forum vote! Petition for the Grad to return!

...and the learning goes on, and on, and on, ... :-)
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