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The death of calculator market?
06-09-2020, 08:33 AM
Post: #1
The death of calculator market?
Due to the current situation, many countries have opted for distance education for a long period, and it seems that education will take that course because it will find great benefits. The PC and smartphones will take the true importance in education, at least one more massive and current for these times (They are re-claimed).

I do not pretend to be fatalistic, however is a reformulation of the capabilities of the current calculator software planned? is that possible? Why would someone be interested in buying a calculator right now? a long time has passed and we have not yet received a statement. Is starting to charge for the virtual-PC calculator one of the measures?

LATIN AMERICA: The student will no longer leave home, why would he need a calculator if his work will be perennial on the computer and the phone with educational tools that were always at hand but that many times due to the ineptitude of the teachers not were used properly, For now I have been very careful with this and I do not recommend buying in case you ask me.

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06-09-2020, 12:00 PM
Post: #2
RE: The death of calculator market?
I don’t think teachers will like to have a classroom full of students using their smartphones.
The calculator is a nice tool dedicated to maths, even if there are always games on them, but it is not as tempting as social networks.

France: There is also the exam mode, even if some parents (and teachers) would like it to disappear, because it reinforces social inequalities.
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06-09-2020, 09:05 PM
Post: #3
RE: The death of calculator market?
(06-09-2020 12:00 PM)pinkman Wrote:  I don’t think teachers will like to have a classroom full of students using their smartphones.
The calculator is a nice tool dedicated to maths, even if there are always games on them, but it is not as tempting as social networks.

France: There is also the exam mode, even if some parents (and teachers) would like it to disappear, because it reinforces social inequalities.

In a traditional classroom setting, sure, but when all of your students are in their own homes having class via Zoom/WebEx/Google Meet, it's pretty much impossible to police what device they're using. I suspect TI is a bit nervous about what their back-to-school revenues will look like this fall.
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06-09-2020, 09:34 PM
Post: #4
RE: The death of calculator market?
My daughter confessed that she and all her classmates communicated the results via WhatsApp or equivalent, during a Zoom/WebWx course. There is no way to police the students during locked down. But I don’t think we’re at the beginning of a new era of successive locked down periods (maybe I am wrong).

So, IMHO, for TI, Casio, HP and others the challenge is always the same: create the most complete but cheapest tools to help students finish their studies and quickly forget calculators because of smartphones or computer tools that make calculators look like useless dinosaurs.
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06-09-2020, 09:50 PM
Post: #5
RE: The death of calculator market?
According to this article of 2019 (French, sorry : https://www.lesechos.fr/tech-medias/high...es-1124852), the constant evolution of school curricula and the rules of the exam mode makes sales stable.
This was before COVID of course.

“ Reste que les rivaux Casio et Texas Instruments partagent une particularité : ce ne sont pas les calculatrices qui les font vivre. Le premier génère l'essentiel de ses revenus via ses montres, le second avec ses activités dans les semi-conducteurs. La calculatrice ne représente l'avenir ni de l'un ni de l'autre, mais ce produit n'est pas encore à classer dans la catégorie « vintage » et représente une jolie rente de situation pour eux.”

“ The fact remains that the rivals Casio and Texas Instruments share a peculiarity: it is not the calculators that keep them alive. The former generates most of its income from watches, the latter from its activities in semiconductors. The calculator does not represent the future of either, but this product is not yet to be classified in the “vintage” category and represents a nice situation for them.”

(Not a word about HP or NumWorks, but it is not specialized press)
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06-10-2020, 05:26 AM
Post: #6
RE: The death of calculator market?
Hello,

What it boils down to is "official" tests...

As long as "officials" tests with students sitting in a controlled environment exists, calculators stays a market as each student will have to come with his calculator.

To return on some points made:
- Covid showed that distance learning sucks. It has been tested around the world in mass and the agreement seems to be that... it sucks. For having 2 kids (10 and 13) that have lived through it, as a parent, I can tell that... it sucked (from a learning standpoint)... so covid will not do anything against calcs

- Yes, computers and smartphones can do all what the calculators can... (give or take)... There is an app for it. BUT and it is a big BUT, all these apps are separate, single purpose entities. They do NOT group all the math in one place, they all have different UI, different bugs, different ways to do things and there is no way to exchange data from one to the other (at least not in a meaningful way). the calculator do allow you to do that. it is, to some extent, priceless.

Cyrille

Although I work for the HP calculator group, the views and opinions I post here are my own. I do not speak for HP.
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06-10-2020, 06:58 AM
Post: #7
RE: The death of calculator market?
An example of the power and convenience of CAS calculators over desktop and mobile alternatives is that they easily handle symbolic matrices (e.g., matrices filled with polynomial elements) which popular open-source numerical software (e.g., NumPy) cannot. While symbolic matrix operations are available in desktop and mobile CAS systems they are seldom as convenient to use as in a CAS calculator.

Admittedly, symbolic matrices (useful in control systems) are not a common use for calculators, but they represent one among many long-standing strengths of CAS calculators over non-calculator alternatives. So paraphrasing Mark Twain, "reports of the death of the CAS calculator market may be greatly exaggerated."
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