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[VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
04-01-2019, 12:49 AM
Post: #21
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
You are right Albert and I can't find a way around.
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04-01-2019, 03:25 PM (This post was last modified: 04-03-2019 06:01 PM by Albert Chan.)
Post: #22
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
Just figured out how to improve cin(x) accuracy for large x Smile

cin(x) = arcsin(cin(sin(x))) = nest(arcsin, cin(nest(sin, x, n)), n)

Pick enough nested sin's so cin argument is small, say below 0.1 radian

cin[x0_] := Block[ {n=0, x=x0+0.0},
    While[Abs[x] ≥ 0.1, x = Sin[x]; n++];
    Nest[ArcSin, x - (1/18) x^3 - (7/1080) x^5 - (51/32285) x^7, n]
]

Above cin(x) setup give about 12 digits accuracy:

x        cin(x)                         cin(cin(cin(x))) - sin(x)
0.0     0.0                             +0.0
0.2     0.199553461081         -1.9e-16
0.4     0.396375366278         +1.8e-14
0.6     0.587446695546         -1.1e-16
0.8     0.769025184826         -9.1e-14
1.0     0.935745970819         +1.4e-13
Pi/2.   1.210368344457         +2.6e-13
-0.71 -0.688778525307         -1.6e-13
2.019  1.026923318694        +6.4e-13

Edit: changed x^7 coefficient from -0.00158 to -51/32285 to get better accuracy
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04-01-2019, 04:42 PM (This post was last modified: 04-01-2019 06:29 PM by J-F Garnier.)
Post: #23
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
(04-01-2019 03:25 PM)Albert Chan Wrote:  Just figured out how to improve cin(x) accuracy for large x Smile

cin(x) = arcsin(cin(sin(x))) = nest(arcsin, cin(nest(sin, x, n)), n)

Pick enough nested sin's so cin argument is small, say below 0.1 radian

cin[x0_] := Block[ {n=0, x=Evaluate[x0+0.0]},
    While[Abs[x] ≥ 0.1, x = Sin[x]; n++];
    Nest[ArcSin, x - (1/18) x^3 - (7/1080) x^5 - 0.00158 x^7, n]
]
...

Excellent !
Here is the HP71 version and results, after decipher of your code (not familiar with that language...):

10 ! SSMC24
20 A=-1/18 @ B=-7/1080 @ C=-.00158
30 DEF FNC(X)
40 N=0
50 X=SIN(X) @ N=N+1 @ IF ABS(X)>=.1 THEN 50
60 ! X=X+A*X^3+B*X^5+C*X^7
61 X=C*X^7+B*X^5+A*X^3+X ! better
70 FOR I=1 TO N @ X=ASIN(X) @ NEXT I
80 FNC=X
90 END DEF
100 !
110 FOR X=.2 TO 1 STEP .2
120 Y=FNC(FNC(FNC(X)))
130 PRINT X;Y;SIN(X);Y-SIN(X)
140 NEXT X

>RUN
.2 .198669330795 .198669330795 0
.4 .389418342314 .389418342309 .000000000005
.6 .564642473542 .564642473395 .000000000147
.8 .717356091570 .717356090900 .000000000670
1. .841470984040 .841470984808 -.000000000768

>FNC(PI/2);FNC(FNC(FNC(PI/2)))
1.2103683495 .999999998579

>FNC(-0.71)
-.688778525229

>FNC(2.019)
1.02692332142

J-F
[Edited: reversed the order of the polynom term evaluation, for slightly better accuracy]
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04-02-2019, 10:43 PM
Post: #24
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
       
Hi, all:
        
Continuing with my original solutions, today it's time for:

Tier 4 - The Challenge:

Consider the n-point dataset  (1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 5), (4, 7), (5, 11), (6, 13), ..., (n, pn)   (the prime numbers), and the (n-1)st degree polinomial fit to this dataset of the form:

            P(x) = a0 + a1 (x-1) + a2 (x-1) (x-2) + ... + an-1 (x-1) (x-2) (x-3) ... (x-(n-1))

Write a program that takes no inputs but computes and outputs the limit of the sum of the coefficients  a0,  a1, ... , an-1  when n tends to infinity.


My original solution:

My original solution for the HP-71B is this 4-liner (168 bytes):

       1  DESTROY ALL @ OPTION BASE 0 @ REPEAT @ N=N+1 @ DIM C(N) @ T=S
       2  FOR I=1 TO N @ C(I)=FPRIM(C(I-1)+1) @ NEXT I @ S=0
       3  FOR I=1 TO N-1 @ FOR J=N TO I+1 STEP -1 @ C(J)=C(J)-C(J-1) @ NEXT J @ NEXT I
       4  FOR I=1 TO N @ S=S+C(I)/FACT(I-1) @ NEXT I @ UNTIL S=T @ DISP N;S

       >RUN
              20    3.40706916561     { it converged to the limit after fitting the first 20 primes: 2, 3, 5, ..., 71) }

Notes:
  • Line 1  initializes and begins the loop to compute the sum of the first n coefficients
  • Line 2  fills an array with the first n primes
  • Line 3  computes the forward differences in-place (replacing the primes)
  • Line 4  computes the sum of the coefficients (differences / factorials) and loops back until it agrees with the previous sum, then outputs it

That's all for Tier 4, thanks a lot to Albert Chan for his interest in this particular tier and congratulations for providing a correct solution and some explanation but please, Albert, next time *do* provide actual code for an HP calculator of your choice, so that people can try your solution for themselves.

In the next days I'll post my solutions for the remaining tiers.

V.
 
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04-03-2019, 02:05 AM
Post: #25
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
(04-02-2019 10:43 PM)Valentin Albillo Wrote:       
       >RUN
              20    3.40706916561     { it converged to the limit after fitting the first 20 primes: 2, 3, 5, ..., 71) }

I think you meant sum converged using 19 primes (20 primes to confirm 12-digits convergence)

sum using 19 primes = 414453 270752 384363 / 19! ≈ 3.40706 916563
sum using 20 primes = 414453 270752 580132 / 19! ≈ 3.40706 916563

Also, forward difference tables may be built incrementally.

C(1) = p1
C(2) = p2 - p1
C(3) = p3 - 2 p2 + p1,
C(4) = p4 - 3 p3 + 3 p2 - p1,
C(5) = p5 - 4 p4 + 6 p3 - 4 p2 + p1,
...

Above can be simplified without a prime table:

C(1) = p1
C(2) = p2 - C(1)
C(3) = p3 - C(1) - 2 C(2)
C(4) = p4 - C(1) - 3 C(2) - 3 C(3)
C(5) = p5 - C(1) - 4 C(2) - 6 C(3) - 4 C(4)
...
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04-03-2019, 02:57 AM (This post was last modified: 04-27-2019 05:02 PM by Albert Chan.)
Post: #26
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
I only have a HP-12C, which is not powerful enough to make primes, build delta tables ...

XCas code:

terms(n) := {
local c, s, p, j, k;
c := flatten(matrix(n,0)); s := 0; p := 0;
for(j:=0; j<n; j++) {
    p := nextprime(p);
    c[j] := p;
    for(k:=0; k<j; k++) c[j] := c[j] - comb(j,k) * c[k];
    s += c[j] / float(j!);
    print(p, s);
    }
}

terms(20) →

02 2.0
03 3.0
05 3.5
07 3.33333333333
11 3.45833333333
13 3.38333333333
17 3.41527777778
19 3.40476190476
23 3.4076140873
29 3.40696097884
31 3.40708691578
37 3.40706684905
41 3.4070693814
43 3.40706915834
47 3.40706916344
53 3.40706916625
59 3.40706916552
61 3.40706916564
67 3.40706916563
71 3.40706916563

Edit: replaced Python code to XCas, so HP prime user can try out.
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04-05-2019, 01:58 AM
Post: #27
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
       
Hi, all:
        
At long last, today it's time for my final original solution, namely:

Tier 5 - The Challenge:

Consider the function  cin(x)  which has the defining property that   cin(cin(cin(x))) = sin(x).

Write a program or function which accepts an argument x in the range [-Pi, Pi] and outputs the corresponding value of  cin(x) correct to at least 8-10 digits in the whole range. Use it to tabulate cin(x) for x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, ..., 1.0 and also to compute cin(Pi/2), cin(-0.71), cin(2.019).

My original solution:

My original solution for the HP-71B is the following user-defined function (plus initialization code):

       1  DESTROY ALL @ OPTION BASE 1 @ DIM C(7) @ READ C
       2  DATA 1,-1/18,-7/1080,-643/408240,-13583/29393280,-29957/215550720,-24277937/648499737600

       3  DEF FNC(X) @ L=0 @ M=1/3 @ REPEAT @ X=SIN(X) @ L=L+1 @ UNTIL ABS(X)<M
       4  S=0 @ FOR Z=1 TO 7 @ S=S+C(Z)*X^(2*Z-1) @ NEXT Z
       5  FOR Z=1 TO L @ S=ASIN(S) @ NEXT Z @ FNC=S @ END DEF

Instead of tabulating it for  0.0, 0.2, ..., 1.0  as I originally asked, let's better tabulate it for x from 0 to Pi/2 in steps of Pi/10:

       6  FOR X=0 TO PI/2 STEP PI/10
       7  Y=FNC(FNC(FNC(X))) @ DISP X;FNC(X);Y;SIN(X);Y-SIN(X) @ NEXT X

       >FIX 10
       >RUN
                   x           cin(x)        cin(cin(cin(x)))    sin(x)       Error
              ----------------------------------------------------------------------
              0.0000000000   0.0000000000      0.0000000000   0.0000000000     0 
              0.3141592654   0.3124163699      0.3090169944   0.3090169944  -1.0E-12
              0.6283185307   0.6138343796      0.5877852523   0.5877852523   2.2E-11
              0.9424777961   0.8897456012      0.8090169944   0.8090169944   4.1E-11
              1.2566370614   1.1122980783      0.9510565164   0.9510565163   1.0E-10
              1.5707963268   1.2103683445      1.0000000000   1.0000000000   1.0E-11

So we've got 10 correct decimals or better, as the error in  cin(x)  is even smaller than the error in  cin(cin(cin(x)))-sin(x)  which doesn't exceed 10-10. As for the discrete values asked in the challenge:

       >FIX 10 @ FNC(PI/2); FNC(-0.71); FNC(2.019)

              1.2103683445   -0.6887785253   1.0269233188


Notes:
  • Line 4 evaluates the formal series in a simple loop but that's not optimal. I know of several better ways to evaluate the series but I don't want to digress from the main subject, which is the computation of cin(x).
     
  • Albert Chan found the correct conjugation (sin/arcsin) procedure to increase accuracy and almost duplicated my original solution but there's an important difference which affects both accuracy and running time. He used up to the x7 term in his formal series expansion:

           x - (1/18) x3 - (7/1080) x5 - 0.00158 x7

    and then iterated the sine of the argument till it got < 0.1, while my original solution uses up to the x13 term:

           x - 1/18 x3 - 7/1080 x5 - 643/408240 x7 - 13583/29393280 x9 - 29957/215550720 x11 - 24277937/648499737600 x13

    and iterates until the sin gets < 1/3. This way significantly fewer sin/arcsin iterations are needed and the computation is both more accurate and faster. For instance, to see how many iterations my function performs when computing  cin(Pi/2)  just execute this:

           >FNC(PI/2);L
                                1.2103683445     24

    thus 24 sin/arcsin were necessary for this argument while in J-F Garnier's HP-71B version of Albert Chan's code several hundred sines/arcsines are necessary to bring this argument below 0.1, which explains why it takes much longer and worse, several decimal places are lost in the process.
     
  • My solution will also work for  tin(x) , defined as  tin(tin(x)) = sin(x) , by simply replacing the coefficients in the DATA statement at line 2 by those of its own formal series, namely:

           x - x3/12 - x5/160 - 53/40320 x7 - 23/71680 x9 - 92713/1277337600 x11 + ...

    and of course it will also work for any other such functions as well.
     
  • The coefficients of the formal series for  cin(x)  and  tin(x)  can be obtained in a number of ways (even manually for the first 4 or so !), most easily by using some CAS which can deal with formal series (even a version of Newton's method for solving f(x) = 0 can be put to the task), but it's important to be aware that both formal series do not converge.

    In fact, their radius of convergence is 0 and thus they behave like asymptotic series, so you can't get arbitrarily accurate results by taking more and more terms, you must instead truncate the series after a certain number of terms to get the most accurate results. Using further terms only worsens the accuracy.
     
  • Although at first sight the coefficients of the formal series for  cin(x)  and  tin(x)  seem to (slowly) get smaller and smaller, matter of fact they tend to grow ever bigger after a while, tending to infinity. For instance, for  tin(x)  we find that the smallest coefficient in absolute value is:

           Coeff37 = -0.000000000594338574503

    but afterwards we have, e.g.:

           Coeff101 = 0.0833756228055

           Coeff151 = 388536047335.239

           Coeff201 = 6555423874651256623811186991.51

           Coeff251 = -35365220492708296140377087748804440170254492009.57


That's all for Tier 5, I could say a whole lot more about this topic and post additional code and results but this post is long enough as it is so I'll stop right now.

Thank you very much to Albert Chan, J-F Garnier, Oulan and Gerson W. Barbosa for your valuable contributions and to Werner for your interest, I hope you enjoyed it all ! Smile

V.
 
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04-05-2019, 07:40 PM (This post was last modified: 04-07-2019 04:12 PM by Albert Chan.)
Post: #28
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
Below Lua code scale cin argument to [sin(0.5), 0.5], do cin, then undo asin/sin's

local sin, asin = math.sin, math.asin

function cin(x)
    local y, n = x*x, 0
    while y > 0.25 do x=sin(x); y=x*x; n=n+1 end
    if y < 0.0324 then   -- |x| < 0.18
        local z = y*(0.00013898 + y*0.00003744) + 13583/29393280
        x = x - x*y*(1/18 + y*(7/1080 + y*(643/408240 + y*z)))
        return n==0 and x or asin(x)
    end    
    while y < 0.229848847 do x=asin(x); y=x*x; n=n-1 end

    y = y - 0.2399        -- |x| = [sin(0.5), 0.5]
    y = 0.013724194890539722 + y*(
          0.058965322546572385 + y*(
          0.007795773378183463 + y*(
          0.002109528417736682 + y*(
          0.000663984666232017 + y*(
          0.000199482968029459 )))))

    x = x - x*y             -- x = cin(x)
    for i=1,n do x = asin(x) end
    for i=1,-n do x = sin(x) end
    return x
end

Result *very* accurate. Example:

x = 2.019
cin(x) = 1.02692 331869 35764
cin(cin(x)) = 0.956628 929996 1186
cin(cin(cin(x))) = 0.90122 698939 98129
math.sin(x)      = 0.90122 698939 98126
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04-07-2019, 04:58 PM
Post: #29
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
Though I did not participate in this challenge, I have taken the liberty of adapting Valantin's Albert's programs into RPL with a twist- unlimited precision.

This program does not run until convergence but a fixed number of iterations, which is the number n that is input into the program. The program requires the external libraries ListExt, GoferLists, and Long Float.

%%HP: T(3)A(R)F(.);
@ Generate list of primes:
\<< \-> n
\<< 2 2 n
START DUP NEXTPRIME
NEXT n \->LIST
@ Inverse binomial transform of above list:
DUP HEAD SWAP 2 n
START \GDLIST DUP HEAD SWAP
NEXT DROP n \->LIST
@ List of factorials 0 through n:
1 n 1 - LSEQ
\<< *
\>> Scanl1 +
@ Divide to form list of ratios:
/
@ Accumulate above list:
\<< + EVAL
\>> Scanl1
@ Convert to list of LongFloats:
1.
\<< \->FNUM
\>> DOLIST
\>>
\>>

To begin, store a number into the variable DIGITS which sets the precision that LongFloat uses. In this example, I used 50. for DIGITS and 60 for the number of iterations.

I then used the following simple program to turn the resulting list into a string suitable for display or printing:

\<< \->STR 3. OVER SIZE 2. - SUB " " 13. CHR 10. CHR + SREPL DROP
\>>

The result:

2
3
35000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000.E-49
33333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333.E-49
34583333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333.E-49
33833333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333.E-49
34152777777777777777777777777777777777777777777778.E-49
34047619047619047619047619047619047619047619047619.E-49
34076140873015873015873015873015873015873015873016.E-49
34069609788359788359788359788359788359788359788360.E-49
34070869157848324514991181657848324514991181657848.E-49
34070668490460157126823793490460157126823793490460.E-49
34070693813966383410827855272299716744161188605633.E-49
34070691583365194476305587416698527809638920750032.E-49
34070691634410012386202862393338583814774290964767.E-49
34070691662452161790786129410468034806659145283484.E-49
34070691655244232025812713643401474089304777135465.E-49
34070691656406347881896434650869758246042092914175.E-49
34070691656257873262373750840742575708166882908384.E-49
34070691656273966717789714824786163263074495403684.E-49
34070691656272442599684037804120145048719207427525.E-49
34070691656272570305882488238644909673728392032261.E-49
34070691656272560845399289953795750049707556470279.E-49
34070691656272561452781304231311072994035926413957.E-49
34070691656272561421162961843454416475655340721354.E-49
34070691656272561422168859510781044267796095465102.E-49
34070691656272561422203623227227792237954574766870.E-49
34070691656272561422193499936605021028268165932935.E-49
34070691656272561422194680710735493212204028544306.E-49
34070691656272561422194575066153490058695686270606.E-49
34070691656272561422194583144322191113049301542936.E-49
34070691656272561422194582596611005303547258196512.E-49
34070691656272561422194582630026111767164206858021.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628184366702426127844481.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628275666348866780110705.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271661692858309901367.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271810600936280034971.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806504336081216950.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806529151697629234.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806536170465629760.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535499300745912.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535542548688840.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540241528738.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540348557090.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344239572.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344383289.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380187.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380140.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380151.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380150.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380149.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380150.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380150.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380150.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380149.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380150.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380150.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380151.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380150.E-49
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380151.E-49

It can be observed that:

-- LongFloat numbers are not very user-friendly. Smile

-- There is noise in the last digit, so really 49-digit accuracy in this case.

-- Rate of converge increases, only about 56 iterations required to confirm 49 digits.
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04-08-2019, 03:36 PM (This post was last modified: 04-10-2019 02:41 AM by Albert Chan.)
Post: #30
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
I posted cin(x) puzzle to the Lua mailing list, and got an elegant solution from Egor Skriptunoff.
Taylor coefficients built on the fly, without any need for CAS. Smile
http://lua-users.org/lists/lua-l/2019-04/msg00063.html

Below code modified a bit for speed, accuracy, and extended cin(x) for tin(x):

Quote:local sin, asin = math.sin, math.asin

local function g(k, m, c, a)     -- assume c[0] = 1, m = [0,999]
    if k < 2 then return c[m] end
    local i = 1000 * k + m
    local r = a[i]
    if r then return r end
    r = g(k-1, m, c, a) + c[m] -- case for j=0 and j=m
    for j = 1, m-1 do
        r = r + c[j] * g(k-1, m-j, c, a)
    end
    a[i] = r
    return r
end

local function f(d, c, a)
    local r = 0
    for j = 1, #c do
        r = r + d[j] * g(2*j+1, #c+1-j, c, a)
    end
    return r
end

function maclaurin_of_cin()
    local c, c2, s = {}, {}, 1
    return function(k)
        for n = #c + 1, k do
            s = -(2*n)*(2*n+1)*s
            local a = {}
            local r, r2 = f(c, c, a), f(c2, c, a)
            local t = (1/s-r-r2)/3
            c[n], c2[n] = t, r + 2*t
        end
        return c[k]
    end
end

function maclaurin_of_tin()
    local c, s = {}, 1
    return function(k)
        for n = #c + 1, k do
            s = -(2*n)*(2*n+1)*s
            c[n] = (1/s - f(c, c, {})) / 2
        end
        return c[k]
    end
end

function egor(x)
    if x*x > 0.25 then return asin(egor(sin(x))) end
    local r, p, s, n, R = 0, x, x*x, 0
    repeat
        R, n, p = r, n+1, p*s
        r = r + maclaurin_coefs(n) * p
    until r == R
    return r + x
end

lua> maclaurin_coefs = maclaurin_of_tin()
lua> for i=50,125,25 do    -- match post #28 Coefs
:      print(2*i+1, maclaurin_coefs(i))
:      end
101  0.08337562280550574
151  388536047335.2163
201  6.555423874650777e+027
251  -3.536522049267692e+046

lua> function nest(f,x,n) for i=1,n do x=f(x);print(i, x) end end
lua> nest(egor, 2.019, 2) -- egor = tin
1      0.9894569770589354
2      0.9012269893998129

lua> maclaurin_coefs = maclaurin_of_cin()
lua> nest(egor, 2.019, 3) -- egor = cin
1      1.0269233186935764
2      0.9566289299961186
3      0.9012269893998129

lua> math.sin(2.019)
0.9012269893998126
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04-09-2019, 06:53 PM
Post: #31
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
(04-07-2019 04:58 PM)John Keith Wrote:  It can be observed that:

-- LongFloat numbers are not very user-friendly. Smile


They needn't be so.

34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380151.E-49

\<< ZZ\<-\->F -51 FC? { "." } { "," } IFTE SWAP ROT \->STR DUP SIZE ROT + OVER 1 ROT SUB ROT + " " ROT + 1 ROT REPL
\>>

EVAL

-->

3.4070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380151

---

# EE7Dh
100 bytes,

which can be optimized, of course.
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04-09-2019, 11:37 PM
Post: #32
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
.
Hi again, all

(04-05-2019 07:40 PM)Albert Chan Wrote:  Below Lua code scale cin argument to [sin(0.5), 0.5], do cin, then undo asin/sin's [...] Result *very* accurate. Example:
x = 2.019
cin(x) = 1.02692 331869 35764
cin(cin(x)) = 0.956628 929996 1186
cin(cin(cin(x))) = 0.90122 698939 98129
math.sin(x)      = 0.90122 698939 98126

Indeed, impressive accuracy ! Thanks a lot for your Lua code, Albert Chan, I hope you'll adapt it to some HP calc's native programming language when you eventually get your hands on one (apart from the HP-12C, that is). Smile

(04-07-2019 04:58 PM)John Keith Wrote:  Though I did not participate in this challenge, I have taken the liberty of adapting Valantin's Albert's programs into RPL with a twist- unlimited precision.[...] The result:
[...]
34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380151.E-49
[...]
-- Rate of converge increases, only about 56 iterations required to confirm 49 digits.

Yes, it does converge very fast and I love multiprecision computations and results. In fact, I don't understand why HP didn't ever include it in some of its advanced models right from the box (at least double precision as in some SHARP models which would do 20 digits without batting an eyelid.)

Thanks a lot for your interest and your RPL high-precision results, much appreciated.

(04-08-2019 03:36 PM)Albert Chan Wrote:  I posted cin(x) puzzle to the Lua mailing list, and got an elegant solution from Egor Skriptunoff. Taylor coefficients built on the fly, without any need for CAS. Smile
http://lua-users.org/lists/lua-l/2019-04/msg00063.html
[...]
Below code modified a bit for speed, accuracy, and extended cin(x) for tin(x):
[...]
lua> function nest(f,x,n) for i=1,n do x=f(x);print(i, x) end end
lua> nest(egor, 2.019, 2) -- egor = tin
1      0.9894569770589354
2      0.9012269893998129

lua> maclaurin_coefs = maclaurin_of_cin()
lua> nest(egor, 2.019, 3) -- egor = cin
1      1.0269233186935764
2      0.9566289299961186
3      0.9012269893998129

lua> math.sin(2.019)
0.9012269893998126

As I said before, truly excellent accuracy. Also thank you very much for posting my challenge to the Lua forums, for giving me credit for it, and for your outstandingly clear code which also includes an implementation and high-precision results fot the tin(x) function I mentioned in the challenge. Again, really appreciated.

(04-09-2019 06:53 PM)Gerson W. Barbosa Wrote:  
(04-07-2019 04:58 PM)John Keith Wrote:  It can be observed that: [...] LongFloat numbers are not very user-friendly. Smile

They needn't be so.

34070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380151.E-49
[...]
3.4070691656272561422194582628271806535540344380151

Very good effort to increase usability. As you know RPL is not my thing but I can appreciate your ingenuity. Thanks, Gerson.

Best regards to all of you.
V.
.
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04-10-2019, 04:11 PM (This post was last modified: 04-10-2019 04:11 PM by John Keith.)
Post: #33
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
(04-09-2019 11:37 PM)Valentin Albillo Wrote:  Yes, it does converge very fast and I love multiprecision computations and results. In fact, I don't understand why HP didn't ever include it in some of its advanced models right from the box (at least double precision as in some SHARP models which would do 20 digits without batting an eyelid.)

Thanks a lot for your interest and your RPL high-precision results, much appreciated.

Thanks for your kind words, Valentin. The HP 49 and 50 do have exact integers whose size is limited only by memory. Though LongFloat is an external library and is a bit rough around the edges, its precision can be set up to 9999 digits. At that point, I think formatting becomes moot. Smile
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04-13-2019, 08:01 PM
Post: #34
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
Hello Valentin,
I don't understand the term composite in the context of Tier 2. I first thought, that the result of SB must have at least 2 digits, but that can't be the point. Please explain what's meant by composite.

Best regards
Bernd
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04-13-2019, 10:35 PM (This post was last modified: 04-14-2019 08:53 PM by Albert Chan.)
Post: #35
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
I recently created nextprime.lua, which is needed for solving Tier 2 puzzle.
My Lua code available in https://github.com/achan001/PrimePi

Quote:p = require 'nextprime'

function sb(base, n)
    local t, d = 0
    while n > 0 do
        d = n % base; t = t + d; n = (n-d)/base
    end
    return t
end

function sb_find(base, n)
    if not n then n=1 end
    return function()
        repeat n = p.nextprime(n) until not p.isprime(sb(base, n))
        return n
    end
end

lua> function loop(n,f) for i=1,n do io.write(f(),' ') end print() end

lua> seq=sb_find(7)
lua> loop(10,seq)
7 4801 9547 9601 11311 11317 11941 11953 13033 13327

lua> seq=sb_find(31)
lua> loop(10,seq)
31 619 709 739 769 829 859 919 1549 1579
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04-13-2019, 11:27 PM
Post: #36
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
 
Hi, Bernd Grubert and Albert Chan:

(04-13-2019 08:01 PM)Bernd Grubert Wrote:  I don't understand the term composite in the context of Tier 2. [...] Please explain what's meant by composite.

With pleasure. In this context composite simply means not prime, i.e., if a number is not prime (thus it can be factored as the product of at least two not necessarily distinct prime factors) then it is considered composite. For instance:

         25 is composite because it's not a prime, as it can be factored as 5 * 5 (two identical prime factors).

         23 isn't composite because it's a prime, as its prime factoring is just itself, 23 (a single prime).

Thanks for your interest. Should you have any further doubts, just tell me.

(04-13-2019 10:35 PM)Albert Chan Wrote:  I recently created nextprime.lua, which is needed for solving Tier 2 puzzle.
[...]
lua> seq=sb_find(7)
lua> loop(10,seq)
7 4801 9547 9601 11311 11317 11941 11953 13033 13327

Nope, this computed sequence for base 7 and all others that follow are incorrect and thus not valid solutions for Tier 2. I think you misunderstood what's actually being asked, which I repeat here with some relevant highlighting for your convenience:
  • "Write a program that accepts a base B (2 to 36) and outputs in order those prime numbers N such that SB(N) is composite and distinct from the previous ones, where SB(N) is a function which returns the sum of the base-B digits of a given integer N."

Best regards to all.
V.
 
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04-14-2019, 04:39 PM
Post: #37
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
Hello Valentin,
Thanks for the explanation. Now everything is clear.

Best regards
Bernd
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04-14-2019, 07:57 PM
Post: #38
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
Somehow I had completely missed Tier 2 until I saw Bernd's post #35. Then I thought I had a good program until I saw Albert's reply and realized the uniqueness requirement, so back to the drawing board.

This problem turns out to be a good fit for the 50g and the Prime, both of which have NEXTPRIME and ISPRIME? as built-in functions.

My program also uses the I->BL command plus a couple of other commands from ListExt. I have tried to keep stackrobatics to a minimum in the interest of readability.



%%HP: T(3)A(R)F(.);
\<< I\->R \-> b n
\<< { } 1 1. n
START NEXTPRIME DUP b I\->BL LSUM DUP
IF ISPRIME?
THEN DROP
ELSE ROT SWAP DUP2
IF POS
THEN DROP SWAP
ELSE + OVER + SWAP
END
END
NEXT DROP DUP SIZE 2. / LDIST EVAL
\>>
\>>

Inputs are the base on level 2 and the number of primes to check on level 1. Output are two separate lists, the composites and the primes.

I would classify the size (163 bytes) and speed as reasonable if not exactly prize-winning, and it is sort of cheating as it uses so many pre-existing commands. I shudder to think of writing such a program on a "classic" era machine.

I have checked the first 100000 primes for 7 and 31, which take over 5 minutes each on the emulator, so my results are nowhere near as extensive as Albert's. Still a neat problem, I only wish I had noticed it earlier.
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04-20-2019, 10:47 AM (This post was last modified: 04-20-2019 10:48 AM by Bernd Grubert.)
Post: #39
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
Hello Valentin,
here is my solution to Tier 2. It is 192 bytes long, due to the lack of prime number checking and the remainder function on the HP-15C.
I have done the test runs on the HP-15C emulator on a PC, since the processing time on my DM-15L is far too long...

Since the largest integer number the HP-15C can exactly represent is 9,999,999,999. , this implementation of the Miller-Rabin algorithm can check only number up to 99,999.
Due to memory limitations, on the real HP-15C and the DM 15L the longest sequence is 26 values.

For base 31 I got the sequence: 619, 18257, ...,(I stopped at 34139 after ~90 min., because I didn't want to wait any longer)

For base 7 I got the sequence: 4801, ...,(I stopped at 23451 after ~60 min.)

I have attached an HTML-documentation and a txt-file, that can be read into the emulator after changing the extension back to ".15c":
.htm  Tier_2.htm (Size: 49.27 KB / Downloads: 0) and
.txt  Tier_2.txt (Size: 6.5 KB / Downloads: 1) .

Best regards
Bernd
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04-21-2019, 07:06 AM (This post was last modified: 04-21-2019 10:47 PM by Gilles.)
Post: #40
RE: [VA] Short & Sweet Math Challenge #24: "2019 Spring Special 5-tier"
Tier 1 :

Here is my solution without reading others responses. I image that there exists better way. This one is "bestial" ;D Always impressed how fast NewRPL is.

Brutal force :

1/ HP50g NewRPL or RPL

Code:
«
 0 
 1000001111 1E10 FOR 'n' 
  n ->STR
  IF "0" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
   IF "1" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
    IF "2" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
     IF "3" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
      IF "4" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
       IF "5" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
        IF "6" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
         IF "7" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
          IF "8" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
           IF "9" "" SREPL 1 == THEN 
            SWAP 1 + SWAP
  END END END END END END END END END END
  DROP
 11111 STEP
»
Solved in only 1.3s in newRPL (on my PC) , 116s with HP50g hdw, much much slower in 779s in RPL (on my PC with Emu48). NewRPL 600 times faster in this case on a PC.
2/ HP50g RPL with ListExt, shorter but slower

Code:
« 0 1000001111 1E10 FOR n  n I->NL LDDUP SIZE 10 == { 1 + } IFT  11111 STEP »
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