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(HP-65) Computation of Semi-Infinite Integrals …
01-30-2019, 01:33 PM
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(HP-65) Computation of Semi-Infinite Integrals …
An extract from Computation of Semi-Infinite Integrals on a Programmable Hand Calculator, Comp. & Maths with Appls Vol 3. pp 191-196.

Abstract-Two functions arising in physical applications which are defined by complicated integral expressions are evaluated on a programmable hand calculator: The method is based on a quadrature rule using nodes in a geometric progression. This rule is particularly suitable for use on a hand calculator because the weights and nodes are easily generated during the calculations.

INTRODUCTION
The hand calculator has developed into an instrument which can be used for calculations of considerable complexity. Surveys of the use of such calculators are given by Smith[l] and by Killingbeck[2], but it is difficult to keep up with such a rapidly developing field. This note reports on the use of a HP 65 programmable calculator to evaluate two functions defined by formidable integral expressions.


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01-30-2019, 04:03 PM
Post: #2
RE: (HP-65) Computation of Semi-Infinite Integrals …
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Hi, SlideRule:

Very interesting, amazing what they accomplished 42 years ago with such groundbreaking HP calcs as the HP-65.

It was really jaw-dropping back then, as I was fortunate enough to experience it myself. Smile

Thanks for sharing.
V.
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Find All My HP-related Materials here:  Valentin Albillo's HP Collection
 
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01-30-2019, 07:35 PM
Post: #3
RE: (HP-65) Computation of Semi-Infinite Integrals …
(01-30-2019 04:03 PM)Valentin Albillo Wrote:  … Very interesting, amazing … 42 years ago … with … the HP-65 … Thanks for sharing … V

You're welcome! As I reconnect various articles to an e-address (url), I'll post same (they seem to have a modest interest). It seems apropos for MoHPC (museum?), yes?

I also teethed on an HP-65 & an HP-25 while completing my undergraduate degrees in Physical Science & Civil Engineering. A significant portion of my library resides in that time frame, the remainder followed with my acquisition of HP-41 models. Those were the days.

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