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TI has just come out with an update of the nspire CX II CAS with a capacitive touchpad rather than the mechanical one. The new revision has a hardware code ending in AK. I have an AF model which is earlier. Is there a way to tell which revision you're getting from an unopened package? I'd like to update mine but don't want to risk buying another older model.
Please stop posting that wrong information everywhere (tiplanet, google groups, reddit, here, etc.).

Just to be clear: it's the same on the outside. Just an internal component (and/or driver) change. Might have a better quality/precision sensing touch though. It's always been capacitive for the touch sensing part (the other option, resistive, wouldn't work, it needs more pressure etc.)
More info here: http://software-dl.ti.com/msp430/msp430_...y-overview

Anyway, no you can't see the hw rev unless you can take a look at the back of the calc itself to read the datecode and see AK or later.
(09-30-2020 09:38 PM)toml_12953 Wrote: [ -> ]TI has just come out with an update of the nspire CX II CAS with a capacitive touchpad rather than the mechanical one. The new revision has a hardware code ending in AK. I have an AF model which is earlier. Is there a way to tell which revision you're getting from an unopened package? I'd like to update mine but don't want to risk buying another older model.

Adriweb Wrote:Just to be clear: it's the same on the outside. Just an internal component (and/or driver) change. Might have a better quality/precision sensing touch though. It's always been capacitive for the touch sensing part (the other option, resistive, wouldn't work, it needs more pressure etc.)

Tom,
Since the Nspire Touchpad (2010), Nspires have had a capacitive touchpad, or at least I assumed it was capacitive as it worked with a very light touch. However, this touchpad was overlaid on top of a mechanical switch for the arrow keys and selecting.

Adriweb indicated above that there was no external difference. So just to clarify, are you saying that these arrow keys are now non-mechanical as well? Or is the same as it has been? (You could already configure the settings to select non-mechanically by tapping the touchpad.)
(10-04-2020 01:31 PM)Wes Loewer Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-30-2020 09:38 PM)toml_12953 Wrote: [ -> ]TI has just come out with an update of the nspire CX II CAS with a capacitive touchpad rather than the mechanical one. The new revision has a hardware code ending in AK. I have an AF model which is earlier. Is there a way to tell which revision you're getting from an unopened package? I'd like to update mine but don't want to risk buying another older model.

Adriweb Wrote:Just to be clear: it's the same on the outside. Just an internal component (and/or driver) change. Might have a better quality/precision sensing touch though. It's always been capacitive for the touch sensing part (the other option, resistive, wouldn't work, it needs more pressure etc.)

Tom,
Since the Nspire Touchpad (2010), Nspires have had a capacitive touchpad, or at least I assumed it was capacitive as it worked with a very light touch. However, this touchpad was overlaid on top of a mechanical switch for the arrow keys and selecting.

Adriweb indicated above that there was no external difference. So just to clarify, are you saying that these arrow keys are now non-mechanical as well? Or is the same as it has been? (You could already configure the settings to select non-mechanically by tapping the touchpad.)

I haven't see the new model yet but it seems like there is still the mechanical setup but the touchpad is more precise.
(10-04-2020 10:58 PM)toml_12953 Wrote: [ -> ]I haven't see the new model yet but it seems like there is still the mechanical setup but the touchpad is more precise.

I wonder if this involves a higher dpi in the hardware, or maybe just something similar to Windows' "Enhanced pointer precision" in software which uses a non-linear acceleration.
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