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HP Forum Archive 17

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Your favorite calculator?
Message #1 Posted by Ruben on 26 Feb 2007, 11:17 p.m.

Just curious what everyone's favorite HP is. Or if their favorite is even an HP (say it isn't so....). Lots of reasons to pick different models. Rarity, your first, just technically neat, the prize of your collection (if you have one). Could be tough.

I think my favorite is the HP-16C. It doesn't have the visual appeal of the HP-67 (or 34C, which IMHO may be the most attractive ever), but it's been a workhorse for many, many years. Amazingly, I think I'm on the second or third set of batteries since new. Small enough to always have around, and I never worry about it not working.

I'm actually a bit surprised that I decided on this one as my favorite, only because I consider the classics to be the ultimate representatives. I guess the functionality edges some others out.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #2 Posted by Bruce Bergman on 26 Feb 2007, 11:42 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favorite is, and I think always will be, the 19c. Love that calc, with it's printer and coolness factor. Followed second probably by the 25c, which was my first HP.

      
a new spin on an OLD question
Message #3 Posted by allen on 27 Feb 2007, 12:30 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

For just about any age group, you can guess their age or college graduation year based on their favorite calculator. For example here is a real conversation I had with a man I met last month:

"HP calculators are great!! I have both a HP 48S and a 28S at home!"

"I'll bet you graduated college in 1993."

"How did you know!!?"

If he had graduated 3 years earlier or later, he likely would have said "41cx" or "48gx" respectivley. Was that a fluke? No, Both the 41cx and the 48gx are better calculators than the 48s in every way. He liked that because that is what he was exposed to when he 'converted'. The same holds true for many of us.

So really I think the "what is your favorite calculator?" question is just a disguised way of the AGE check they used to do in chat rooms and forums.

Try this: Take 2007 minus 1942 minus the date code from the favorite calculator and you can get an approximate age of the person. (+/- 2 years)

e.g. "I looooooove the Hp-34C!! (1981) 
2007-1942-21=44
Therefore I guess the person to be 42 to 46 years old.

e.e.g. Many of the low-level managers at large companies are carrying around 11c's or 15c's so 2007-1942-25= age 38 to 42

This will hold true until the 48gx owners retire. All of the models after that will be dead within a few years of purchase because of the tragedy that befell the RPN calculator industry with the millenial HP CEO, the merger with COMPAQ, spinoff of Agilent... etc.

Edited: 27 Feb 2007, 12:37 a.m.

            
Re: a new spin on an OLD question
Message #4 Posted by Karl Schneider on 27 Feb 2007, 1:56 a.m.,
in response to message #3 by allen

Hi, Allen --

Quote:
Try this: Take 2007 minus 1942 minus the date code from the favorite calculator and you can get an approximate age of the person. (+/- 2 years)

Hmm, within a span of four years (1979-83), I became infatuated by the new HP-41C, several years later saw a more-attainable HP-34C, subsequently set out to buy one, but bought an HP-15C instead. All of these have the same date-code format. That makes me how old? :-)

Okay, I'm in my forties, like many of us here.

-- KS

            
Re: a new spin on an OLD question
Message #5 Posted by Ruben on 27 Feb 2007, 2:13 a.m.,
in response to message #3 by allen

Funny! Yeah, I guess that makes sense. I'm definitely on the outside of that curve though. 2007-1942-27 = 38. I recently turned 44.

My first was a 41C though, back in junior high it was. Mowed a LOT of lawns and washed a LOT of cars for it. It's not easy being the UberGeek in school. I went to college late though, at 26, and not long afterwards, I was tempted by the new and sexy 48SX because I used to be a gadget nut. It got me through my civil engineering degree though, and I still have it. I guess in reality, I owe a lot to that calculator.

I put myself through college though, as a code jockey in a research lab, hence the love of the 16C. Stuck with the software after school, and still use it, but not daily like I used to.... meetings... grumble...

            
Re: a new spin on an OLD question
Message #6 Posted by Tony Duell on 27 Feb 2007, 5:02 a.m.,
in response to message #3 by allen

Quote:
Try this: Take 2007 minus 1942 minus the date code from the favorite calculator and you can get an approximate age of the person. (+/- 2 years)

It doesn't work for me. I'm nearly 40, my favourite calculator(s) are the 98x0 series (1972-ish).

            
Re: a new spin on an OLD question
Message #7 Posted by Geir Isene on 27 Feb 2007, 7:01 a.m.,
in response to message #3 by allen

Thank you. You made me feel so young.

I am either 24 or -33 years old :)

            
Re: a new spin on an OLD question
Message #8 Posted by Wayne Brown on 28 Feb 2007, 10:44 a.m.,
in response to message #3 by allen

Quote:
Try this: Take 2007 minus 1942 minus the date code from the favorite calculator and you can get an approximate age of the person. (+/- 2 years)

Hmmm... That would make me 43. But actually, I'm 52 (as of today, in fact). I guess that's a pretty good birthday present; you've just made me 9 years younger. Thanks! :-)

It's hard to pick a favorite. I use my 48GX every day, for lots of things; but in some ways I like my 41CX better. However, if I could keep only one, it would be my 16C. That was my first HP, and it has such elegant and unique features that I'd be hard-pressed to give it up. So that's the one whose date code I used for the age calculation.

            
Re: a new spin on an OLD question
Message #9 Posted by Dave Shaffer on 28 Feb 2007, 4:22 p.m.,
in response to message #3 by allen

Your formula shaves a decade or two off my age:

First HP - a '35, suggests I'm 52.

Favorite HP - a '41CX, suggests I'm about 41.

Actual age: 61 (as of less than two weeks ago) I guess more recent geeks get their hands on their first/favorite HP in their teens.

                  
Re: a new spin on an OLD question
Message #10 Posted by Trent Moseley on 28 Feb 2007, 8:46 p.m.,
in response to message #9 by Dave Shaffer

I agree. In my instance even more time off. I'm 80.

tm

P.S. I was 51 when I bought my first, my HP-25C in 1978, and we just keep going.

                        
Re: a new spin on an OLD question
Message #11 Posted by allen on 28 Feb 2007, 9:03 p.m.,
in response to message #10 by Trent Moseley

Yes, I should expect the exceptional attendees of this forum to be exceptional outlayers (speaking normally of course). I have done a poll of non-collecting enthusiasts I can find offline and found nearly all fall within 2 years of the "2007-42-SN" model. It is an interesting spin, is it not? GRIN.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #12 Posted by Howard Owen on 27 Feb 2007, 12:31 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

The 41C was my first, and still rates as my number one pick. It stays forever young with new hardware and software from a dedicated cadre of fanatics around the world. It just feels right in my hand, and I could program it in my sleep.

The 71B is a close second. Its expandability is similar to the 41's, and it has lots of cool toys you can plug in to it. It is also as open a system, with the commented internal source code available for inspection.

Third for me comes the 97. That is such a nice form factor. The large red LEDs are a knockout, too.

Fourth are the RPL machines. RPL has grown on me as a language. I now get a perverse (reverse?) pleasure out of expressing myself in cryptic stack imperatives, with nary an alphanumeric symbol in sight.

Regards,
Howard

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #13 Posted by Richard Garner on 27 Feb 2007, 12:33 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My first experience with HP calculators goes back to when I was about 10 years old. My sister was about to go off to college and her then boyfriend, now husband bought her an HP-35 to use in math and science classes. I was not to see another HP until my junior year in high school where an exchange student from Sweden had an HP-41CV. About 4 years after that I was able to scrape up enough to get my own 41CX. Now over the years I have had several different HP's 41CX, 42S, 48SX/GX, 28S, 15C, 20S and a 33S. The one I always seem to grab the most when I want to do something fast is the 42S. The 41CX being my first actual purchase is a very very close 2nd, but the 42S is small, easy to program, has a great keyboard and display. I consider the 41CX the best calculator HP ever designed, but the 42S has almost everything I want in the perfect size.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #14 Posted by Alan Firth on 27 Feb 2007, 1:07 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favourite is the 25, because it was my first. (2007-1942-15 = 65 - 15 = 50; actually I just turned 48 Not bad.)

Call the 25 the cusp of a normal curve - I've been collecting models from the 35 up to the 41. (So, a 35 would interest a 52 year old, and a 41, a 45 year old... The median, 48.5, is pretty close to my age)

Not coincidentally, the 41C was my second and last HP (bought new, that is)

So I'm saying that a collectors interest tends to vary around the midpoint defined by their two favorites... maybe. Any takers?

Edited: 27 Feb 2007, 1:08 a.m.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #15 Posted by Antonio Maschio (Italy) on 27 Feb 2007, 2:28 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favorite is the HP-15C. Yes, I know, it's not graphic. Yes, I know, it's got few memory for programming OR for registers. Yes, I know, it's not that fast.

But I like it much more than every other calculator in sight. Probably many models (even not HP) may be more useful than the HP-15C nowadays for several jobs, but when I use my HP-15C I feel fine.

-- Antonio

NOTE: This feeling is subject to change. I am not always the same man year after year ;-)

-- Ain't Ono

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #16 Posted by Eric Smith on 27 Feb 2007, 4:28 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favorite is the HP-67, HP-19C, HP-01, HP-34C, HP-41CX, HP-15C, HP-16C, HP-71B, HP-28S, and HP-48SX.

What, you thought I'd be able to choose just one?

If I really had to pick just one that I was actually going to use, I suppose it would have to be the 48SX, because it does everything the others do, except fit on my wrist or have a built-in printer.

Other than that, I actually use the 16C and 28S more than the others. The 16C is most convenient for simple tasks when I'm programming. The 28S is better for more sophisticatd tasks. Although the 28S is not as powerful as the 48SX, I prefer the clamshell design. Though unfortunately it appears that the MTTF of the 28S is lower than that of the 48SX due to the flex circuit through the hinge. It's a very clever design but not as robust.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #17 Posted by Tony Duell on 27 Feb 2007, 5:10 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

You mean I have to pick _one_???

OK, it has to be the HP9830. A totally amazing machine for the time (it has a good claim to being the first personal computer), very well made, repairable, expandable. As an electronics person I like CPUs made from lots of small chips (as this is), and it's one of the few bit-serial processors made from SSI and MSI chips you're likely to find.

But I really don't want to pick just one machine...

The 9100 is probably the most elegant piece of electronics it's ever been my pleasure to work on. There must be way under 1000 transistors in there. Really simple...

If I have to pick a handheld, then it's the HP41CX (as a hacker's toy), but the HP48SX as a calculator. The former because of the I/O and expandability, the latter because unlike many people here I do like the arbitrarily-large stack. The 48 wins over the 28 because of the serial port, I don't like programmable calculators that I can't back up.

For a pocket computer (i.e. something programmable other than in a keystroke language), I like the HP71B. The BASIC on that is very complete, and there's the Forth/Assembler ROM. But for hardware hacking the Sharp (!) PC1500 has a much simpler expansion bus.

Of course on my electronics workbench I have a 16C (what else ;-))

You know it'd be quicker to list the machines I don't like....

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #18 Posted by HrastProgrammer on 27 Feb 2007, 6:56 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

HP-48GX ... followed by HP-71B, HP-41C, HP-42S and HP-15C.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #19 Posted by gileno on 27 Feb 2007, 7:07 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My girls: 41CY and TI-95 :-)

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #20 Posted by David Smith on 27 Feb 2007, 8:04 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

HP9100A/B. Clip one of those puppies to your belt and you will be the envy of geeks everywhere. Not to mention a vice squad or two.

            
Geeks & Vice Squad
Message #21 Posted by John Garza on 3 Mar 2007, 12:26 p.m.,
in response to message #20 by David Smith

Quote:
HP9100A/B. Clip one of those puppies to your belt and you will be the envy of geeks everywhere. Not to mention a vice squad or two.

Oh God, I can see it now.... Geek with pocket protector, horn rim glasses, short sleeve dress shirt, not quite long enough polyester pants, black shoes, white socks, and a hulking mass attached to his waist....

"Hey baby, wanna see my huge calculator?"

"Ever do it Reverse Polish style?"

Ugh. It makes me cringe so much, it 's almost worth making an amateur video for utube. -J

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #22 Posted by Maximilian Hohmann on 27 Feb 2007, 9:24 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

Hello!

Today, my favorite calculator is the hp-71B, because I happen to have taken it with me. Tomorrow, it might as well be the hp-19 or hp-25 (which probably is my real favorite...).

In the days when I really needed a calculator, I couldn't afford HPs and had to stick with a Ti-59, which therfore will always remain my own personal number one. Forever :-)

Anyway, I get more and more pleasure from other non-hp calculators lately, like from the Sinclair Scientific that I got last week (for a ridiculous price compared to what such a rare calculator from hp would have cost me): A very cleverly made, minimalistic RPN scientific thingy that takes half a minute to compute trigonometric functions - you really get a feeling what "calculating" once meant even for a machine.

Greetings, Max

Edited: 27 Feb 2007, 9:24 a.m.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator? (HP-97)
Message #23 Posted by Vassilis Prevelakis on 27 Feb 2007, 10:35 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

I will go for the HP-97. With its beautiful keyboard and huge display, its great.

I have three and one of them is next to me on my desk.

**vp

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #24 Posted by DougT on 27 Feb 2007, 11:35 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

I'd have to say a somewhat haggard 11C is my favorite since I use it daily. My first HP was a 15C I bought new in 1982, but it's in great shape and too valuable to bang around in my duffle bag!

            
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #25 Posted by Ren Tescher on 27 Feb 2007, 12:12 p.m.,
in response to message #24 by DougT

There is a Vulcan proverb. "Wanting is better than having. It is illogical, but often true."

My favorite HP calculator is one I don't have...

Ren dona nobis pacem

                  
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #26 Posted by Dia C. Tran on 27 Feb 2007, 12:54 p.m.,
in response to message #25 by Ren Tescher

I am 52 years old. I did not graduated from college. My first calculator was the 25 which I bought in 1976. My favorite calculator is the 41. I did own the 34C for a week. I bought the 48sx and 48gx shortly after their introduction. I currently also own the 97, 20s and 32SII. So what can you tell about me?

                  
Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #27 Posted by Karl Schneider on 3 Mar 2007, 12:06 a.m.,
in response to message #25 by Ren Tescher

Quote:
There is a Vulcan proverb. "Wanting is better than having. It is illogical, but often true."

I'm not a Star Trek enthusiast, but I just happened to catch most of one of the original 1960's episodes on TV several nights ago, in which Spock repeated this statement. It was the one in which Spock is somewhat compelled to duel to the death against Captain Kirk to "win" his pre-arranged Vulcan bride. Although quite winsome, the young lady is rather conniving, and Spock declines his prize even after he has "killed" Kirk. Spock offers the proverb to the bride's true suitor as words of wisdom.

I also noticed for the first time the communication devices that resembled today's slim flip-open cell phones. Remarkable prescience!

In total, I've probably seen no more than ten Star Trek episodes in all three(?) incarnations of the series, and have never seen a Star Trek movie. So, these comments might be "old hat" to some.

-- KS

                        
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #28 Posted by John Garza on 3 Mar 2007, 11:48 a.m.,
in response to message #27 by Karl Schneider

Quote:

I also noticed for the first time the communication devices that resembled today's slim flip-open cell phones. Remarkable prescience!


It's funny what you can notice. I watched an episode recently where Kirk & Spock walked into a crew recreation room on the ship. In addition to the cool 3D chess sets, I noticed something in the background. It was a large black tv/monitor stuck up on a wall. Looked just like my Sony!

                        
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #29 Posted by Howard Owen on 3 Mar 2007, 1:08 p.m.,
in response to message #27 by Karl Schneider

The original flip phone (or at least, the first one I ever saw,) was the Motorola "StarTac." I think that it wasn't prescience on the part of the Star Trek prop designers so much as excellent design that was then copied by the cell phone makers.

The other prominent design for communications gear I can recall in popular culture is the "two way wrist radio" and later "two way wrist TV" from the American comic strip "Dick Tracy." That idea went exactly nowhere. That's partly because power requirements dictate a larger form factor than the imagined wrist phones had. But even if the electronics and power supply were small enough to fit on your wrist, I suspect you would still prefer a headset to holding your wrist up to your mouth.

Another staple of 1960's Science Fiction, two way video telephony, went a little farther, renamed as "video teleconferencing." But is nowhere near as ubiquitous as the prognosticators expected. In this case I think there are several factors that bar wider adoption, at least in the US. First, the bandwidth for video is expensive to provide, and is still under 50% coverage in the US. Second, letting your callers see you isn't always what you want. If video phones were the rule, denying someone video access could imply things you might not intend. Finally, the voice network is "good enough" for many communications needs. Internet video conferencing is widely available, but so is Internet telephony. The latter is a viable base for several businesses, as POTS (Plain Ol' Telephone Service) still is. The availability of video phones hasn't killed off voice communications.

What's this got to do with calculators? Well, many of us bemoan the fact that the excellent design and construction of the old HP models is nowhere to be found in the modern world. TI calculators are "good enough" to meet the demand. As long as quality and utility meet a minimum standard, people will consistently pick the product that is lower in price, even if the quality is less. The Wal Mart phenomenon proves this.

Now, if only the physics were there to let some of the other design elements from Star Trek come true. I'd love to commute by transporter. Weekly jet setting is tiring.

Regards,
Howard (from DFW)

                              
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #30 Posted by Eric Smith on 3 Mar 2007, 4:09 p.m.,
in response to message #29 by Howard Owen

Quote:
Now, if only the physics were there to let some of the other design elements from Star Trek come true. I'd love to commute by transporter. Weekly jet setting is tiring.

I think I'll pass. The failure rate of the transporter as seen in the various series and films was way to high.

                                    
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #31 Posted by Dave Shaffer on 3 Mar 2007, 6:54 p.m.,
in response to message #30 by Eric Smith

"The failure rate of the transporter as seen in the various series and films was way to high."

Well, for it to became really popular, they'd have to get ->most<- of the bugs out. I'd just wait until the first few million people had used it. By then, things should be fine!

                                    
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #32 Posted by Howard Owen on 3 Mar 2007, 6:58 p.m.,
in response to message #30 by Eric Smith

Quote:
I think I'll pass. The failure rate of the transporter as seen in the various series and films was way to high.

I have two reactions to this. First, no doubt the transdimensional transport carriers will claim it's a lot safer than driving. Second, as long as I'm spinning a fantasy I reserve the right to spin it my way. In my version, a trip in the transporter is always safe, and always sets your biological age one day closer to 24, assuming you are older than that. And yes, you get to keep your experience and judgment so you don't act like a complete idiot when you do get behind the wheel of a car. 8)

Regards,
Howard

                                          
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #33 Posted by Eric Smith on 3 Mar 2007, 7:14 p.m.,
in response to message #32 by Howard Owen

Quote:
And yes, you get to keep your experience and judgment so you don't act like a complete idiot when you do get behind the wheel of a car. 8)

Potential transportee: Will I be able to drive well after I'm transported?
Salesman: Of course!
Potential transportee: That's great, because...

                                                
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #34 Posted by Trent Moseley on 3 Mar 2007, 11:00 p.m.,
in response to message #33 by Eric Smith

You folks have made my day!

tm

                                    
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #35 Posted by Vassilis Prevelakis on 6 Mar 2007, 9:18 a.m.,
in response to message #30 by Eric Smith

 Eric Smith wrote:

> I think I'll pass. The failure rate of the transporter as seen in > the various series and films was way to high.

Doctor Crusher (?) in TNG was also afraid of the transporter and always tried to use a shuttle instead.

**vp

                                          
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #36 Posted by Howard Owen on 6 Mar 2007, 5:46 p.m.,
in response to message #35 by Vassilis Prevelakis

Dr McCoy on the original series had the same phobia.

Is it a physician thing?

In my fantasy, the transporter is implemented by transmitting quantum states of fundamental particles, within uncertainty, from here to there. And a hitherto unknown principle, sort of like a super Pauli exclusion principle, results in the spontaneous dissolution of the "from" particle at the instant the "to" particle is imprinted with the remote states. This would get around the messy need to destroy the from particles, and the philosophical problems of creating duplicates. Due to uncertainty, the worst side effect of "beaming" around might be some nausea and disorientation as your atoms snapped back into place from the random but small relative positional dispersion the beaming created. A balance between knowledge of complementary quantum states would have to be achieved. In my fantasy, this is possible.

The reversion one day closer to 24 for each beaming can't be mocked up in pseudo physics. So I'll just attribute that feature to ancient tribal magic instead. 8)

Regards,
Howard

                                                
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #37 Posted by db on 7 Mar 2007, 1:51 a.m.,
in response to message #36 by Howard Owen

Howard:
Supposedly; transporters have "Heisenberg Compensators" which allow "quantum resolution" of objects.
They put the right spin on things ;-)
And the writers are not uncertain ;-)

Any race that can toss around matter like they do in those transporters can probably pop in and out of regular old spacetime when and where they want to just like in Star Trek too. None are on my Christmas card list though.

What do you want to bet they'd use RPN.

                                                      
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #38 Posted by Howard Owen on 7 Mar 2007, 7:20 p.m.,
in response to message #37 by db

Nice job, "compensating" for a principle of nature!

I think I'll just engage my time compensator to implement the "revert to 24" feature mentioned above. Yeah, that's it. Time compensator, that's the ticket .. 8)

Regards,
Howard

                                    
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #39 Posted by Steve Borowsky on 6 Mar 2007, 9:54 p.m.,
in response to message #30 by Eric Smith

Quote:
I think I'll pass. The failure rate of the transporter as seen in the various series and films was way to high.

Oh C'mon guys, there's no free lunch! Being able to instantly materilaize anywhere is worth something, isn't it? So you have to put up with occasionally being split into two identical yet opposite persons, one good and one evil, with the evil one immediately setting about planning your death; or materializing in some silly mirror image universe, where everyone is brutally hostile. Just think of the time you'll save!!

                        
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek (further off topic)
Message #40 Posted by Jeff O. on 3 Mar 2007, 11:08 p.m.,
in response to message #27 by Karl Schneider

Quote:
So, these comments might be "old hat" to some.
Probably showing my age, and a bit about my personality, but I did not even have to check any references to know that quote came from the episode titled "Amok Time". As far as the prescience of the show goes, the argument has been made that impressionable future scientists and engineers that grew up watching the shows are now making the technology come true.
I agree with the other posters about travel by transporter, it would take a lot of convincing for me to travel that way. I really don't like the method I have heard proposed where instead of actually transporting you from one place to another, you are scanned and an exact copy is made at the remote site from local matter - then the "original" is destroyed!
                              
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek (further off topic)
Message #41 Posted by Walter B on 4 Mar 2007, 6:28 p.m.,
in response to message #40 by Jeff O.

Don't worry. Scanning some E27 atoms you consist of plus their states of excitation necessary to "cut and paste" you at another place will take enough time. So the original will be destroyed by mother nature well before the end of scan. Sorry ;-)

                              
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek (further off topic)
Message #42 Posted by Eric Smith on 5 Mar 2007, 1:38 a.m.,
in response to message #40 by Jeff O.

Quote:
I really don't like the method I have heard proposed where instead of actually transporting you from one place to another, you are scanned and an exact copy is made at the remote site from local matter - then the "original" is destroyed!

I suggest you see the film "The Prestige", which is now out on DVD.

If you ever get the chance, watch the short film "To Be" (1990), written and animated by John Weldon. Unfortunately it is not currently available on video.

                                    
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek (further off topic)
Message #43 Posted by Eric Smith on 5 Mar 2007, 1:46 a.m.,
in response to message #42 by Eric Smith

I just found out that "To Be" is available with some of John Weldon's other animated work on VHS as John Weldon's Lighter Lunacy.

                        
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #44 Posted by Ren Tescher on 6 Mar 2007, 12:44 p.m.,
in response to message #27 by Karl Schneider

Quote:

I also noticed for the first time the communication devices that resembled today's slim flip-open cell phones. Remarkable prescience!

-- KS


A year or so ago The History Channel (a cable television channel in the US) aired the two hour Mockumentary "How William Shatner changed the world". It was hosted by none other than William Shatner.

I don't think I watched the entire program, but I think it was a "response" to a college course titled "How Star Trek changed the World" Both the program and the course pointed to the similarities between today's and Star Trek's technologies as well as the social implications.

Personally, I think the cell phone is great, but I see another convergence occuring between the beds in "Sick Bay" and enhanced patient monitoring and diagnostics (MRI, CAT, PET scans)

Ren

dona nobis pacem

                              
Re: Vulcan proverb from Star Trek
Message #45 Posted by Howard Owen on 6 Mar 2007, 5:55 p.m.,
in response to message #44 by Ren Tescher

The tricorder would be awfully handy as a portable diagnostic tool also.

The technology of Star Trek was elaborate and well thought out. That feature more than any other distinguished the series from any TV project that had gone before. Real hardcore Science Fiction fans, who had been starved for good stuff since Twilight Zone had left the air, seized on Star Trek as a genuine Science Fiction series. It wasn't really "hard" Science Fiction, since the transporter and warp drive had dubious scientific underpinnings. But compared to "Lost in Space," "My Favorite Martian" and "Time Tunnel" it was the real thing.

Regards,
Howard

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #46 Posted by Ed Look on 27 Feb 2007, 1:19 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

Mine is the 34C... and not for its visual design either, though I agree it is very attractive. In the many years it did work, I loved how it worked.

I loved its capabilities and power; I loved how the keys felt; I loved the red glowing display (playing Moon Lander in bed was a gas) ; I loved its programmability and related, it's continuous memory; I loved how solidly it felt in my hands; of course, I absolutely loved the RPN entry.

I even loved the depth of its manual! It had nice illustrations. A non-math major could learn some math and stat just from learning to use the calculator!

(I didn't like how fast the Ni-Cd batteries discharged however.)

The HP-34C; a great calculator.

Edited: 27 Feb 2007, 1:20 p.m.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #47 Posted by Giancarlo (Italy) on 27 Feb 2007, 1:35 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

Hi.
My favourite one is the 42S: so "harmless" in its appearance (might even seem a four-banger :),
so powerful in its internals |-).
Best regards.
Giancarlo

            
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #48 Posted by Ed Look on 27 Feb 2007, 5:50 p.m.,
in response to message #47 by Giancarlo (Italy)

I have never had the pleasure of even touching a 42S, but I have seen pictures.

And from what I see, you may be very right! It IS inoffensive looking, rather pleasing, I'd say, with an unassuming form factor... well, really its flatness... and a soft(er) brown instead of the hardness of black.

Very nice looking machine. I hope someday to get one, just to play with it if not really do work on it.

            
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #49 Posted by Gerson W. Barbosa on 27 Feb 2007, 8:26 p.m.,
in response to message #47 by Giancarlo (Italy)

Ciao Giancarlo,

I would add the HP-42S has the most computing power per cubic inch among all HP RPN calculators. If it only had a two-way interface for storing and loading programs... Well, this has been resolved with Thomas Okken's Free42, to whom I am grateful forever :-)

On my side, my favorite calculator has always been HP's latest top of the line calculator, starting with the HP-28S, then the HP-48G, then the HP-48GX, then the HP-50G! I skipped the 49G and the HP-49G+, because of the keyboard issue - I eventually got a 49G as a test before buying a 49G+. It turns out it was not a bad calculator as I had been led to believe.

But the elegance and comprehensiveness of the HP-15C, my first HP calculator (2343B) is unmatched. That's the only one that goes to work with me everyday, together with the Free42/Power48(HP-49G) combination on my PalmTX. So, I'd say my next favorite calculator is being designed (I hope), but the HP-15C and the HP-42S will always have a place in my heart.

Regards,

Gerson.

P.S.: Allen's clever formula works nicely in my case, if I add a three-year interruption between my last high-school year and my first college year:

2007 - 1942 - 23 + 3 = 45

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #50 Posted by Patrick R on 27 Feb 2007, 2:35 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

Here is my favourite list:

1. HP48GX with Meta Kernel and 1Mb card. The "I can do it all calculator".

2. HP32sii (my first college calculator, the 48 was the 2nd), the number cruncher used almost daily while teaching.

3. HP97, I got it from a very good friend in exchange of a 32sii. Students say that I am crazy when I use it at the blackboard (but I calculate faster than they do). And best of all, it's older than I am!

So how old am I?

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #51 Posted by JimC on 27 Feb 2007, 6:22 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

Good question! One which is guaranteed to draw a response from every HP nut. My favourites: the 21 (I first went to college using the 21), the 41 (I bought this after a rich summer job) and the 42 - because it is powerful, and it is 41 compatible.

I also like the 67, because it brings back the glory days of the space race, but it tends to chew batteries a little more than I w would like.

FWIW, I graduated in engineering in 85.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #52 Posted by Les Bell on 27 Feb 2007, 7:41 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

It's important to love all your children equally. ;)

My favourite calculator isn't my first, which was a 45, although I confess a certain sentimentality about it. Nor is it the 65 and 67 which followed it. They're all long gone, incidentally.

No, it's the 41. I've owned several over the years, but still use my original 41CX on an almost daily basis. But hang on - I carry a 16C around with me, and I do like the Voyager form factor.

And I'm sure that, one day, I will learn to love the 48GX which is resting in my desk drawer.

They're all good.

Best,

--- Les
[http://www.lesbell.com.au]

            
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #53 Posted by Maximilian Hohmann on 28 Feb 2007, 4:04 a.m.,
in response to message #52 by Les Bell

Hello!

Quote:
It's important to love all your children equally. ;)

I'm afraid that for me it is completely impossible to develop deeper feelings for any of the ugly ducklings with their grey LCDs, no matter what their intellectual capabilites may be ;-)

Believe me, I have spent a lot of money trying, and even if there is a fair amount of admiration for some of them, they remain cold and dead objects for me. I need a machine to send photons towards me in order to grow affection for it :-)

Greetings, Max

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #54 Posted by Les Wright on 27 Feb 2007, 8:03 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My first, and happily recently refurbished, HP41CV, plus all manner of fun peripheral goodies. I actually prefer it over my 41CX--that wimpy halfnut display just leaves me a little cold.

The 42S with 82240 printer is a close second. If there were some way to quickly get programs into it, like with the 41 series, it would be my first.

Les

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #55 Posted by S. Easterling on 27 Feb 2007, 10:12 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

Tied between 32S & 12C, and I'm 35 years old! RPL lover at heart, though.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #56 Posted by Miki Mihajlovic on 27 Feb 2007, 10:59 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

Tie between HP-15 and HP-41. Equaly great (but different class) is Curta Type I.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #57 Posted by John Keith on 27 Feb 2007, 11:23 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

I have to agree with Gerson, my favorite is my (less than 2 week old) 50g. According to Allen's formula, that makes me 19 years old, though my driver's license says I'm 48;-)
My second favorite has to be the 11C, the perfect blend of size and features.
Others I have: 49g+ (crummy keyboard); 16C (geekiest); 71B (Sherman tank).
Used to have: 28S, 48SX, 48GX (all broken displays/keyboards, so much for the "good old days"); 15C (lost).
No LED-era classics, too young/poor when they were out, too outraged by Flea-bay prices now!

Regards,

John

      
Re: Your favorite calculator
Message #58 Posted by lary on 28 Feb 2007, 5:20 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favorite (the one i use the most) : HP49G (perhaps the last real HP)

Why ? : RPL, Flash, CAS, not (very) expensive, not 'emulated' and seems more robust than my 49G+

            
Re: Your favorite calculator
Message #59 Posted by DaveK on 1 Mar 2007, 1:20 a.m.,
in response to message #58 by lary

Yes, and more programs/apps/games are compatible with the 49G, but C programming on the new ARM based calculators opens up new possibilities.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #60 Posted by SteveH on 28 Feb 2007, 7:35 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

HP15C without a doubt. I actually sold mine in the 1990's to get and HP42S to perform base conversions but always missed the 15C. It just is the perfect size and layout.

In the end I got my 15C back from the person I sold it to and still use it most days.

            
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #61 Posted by Dia C. Tran on 28 Feb 2007, 9:33 a.m.,
in response to message #60 by SteveH

As in my previous post my favorite is the 41 but my most often used calculator is the 48GX emulator.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #62 Posted by Ivan Nejgebauer on 28 Feb 2007, 10:01 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

Probably the 48SX, as I have used it extensively throughout college. The 15C is a close second -- it may be a pinnacle of non-alphanumeric calculators.

i.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #63 Posted by Antoine M. Couëtte on 28 Feb 2007, 10:49 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

From Osaka Kansaï, Japan, or from anywhere ... actually

My favorite is a mix of both "HP41" and "HP48GX" .

I mean the wonderful HP41X/Y/Z Software HrastProgrammer developped on HP48GX which fully emulates HP41CY on a HP48GX, and does much more, all of this at 3 times the speed of a conventional HP41 ! ( may I for one quite deserved exclamation mark ? ) I find this combination a winning one for most of my applications which absolutely require handheld format.

And - slightly off topic since it is not a "calculator" per se - for time consuming calculations and when handheld is not required, I also use Jean-François Garnier's HP41CY " Emu41 " Emulator. My applications run about 600 times faster on my laptop than on a standard HP41.

Again thank you to all of you, extremely talented and quite unique people, including but not limited to HrastProgrammer and Jean-François, who have made HP41 and Other Calculators ( HP71, HP48 and more ) Emulators available under various forms/supports to the Users Community.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #64 Posted by Chris Roccati on 28 Feb 2007, 12:56 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favorite is the 11C. I still use it almost every day: it has everything you need for "instant" calculations. Anything needing more than that you'll probably best served with a computer...

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #65 Posted by Thomas Okken on 28 Feb 2007, 4:13 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

In terms of usefulness, the HP-42S.
In terms of power and the WOW factor, the entire RPL series (I have a 48G which I like a lot).
In terms of misty-eyed nostalgia, the HP-67. Extremely well made, a true killer calc in its day and still very capable even now, and one of the best-looking ever.

- Thomas

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #66 Posted by Mike Hicks on 28 Feb 2007, 9:33 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favorite is the HP41-CX. Synthetic Programming and all that.

I really like the looks of the HP-65. It is my desktop background.

            
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #67 Posted by Trent Moseley on 28 Feb 2007, 11:40 p.m.,
in response to message #66 by Mike Hicks

That's great. In my case it would be my HP-67 which still works thanks, to the dedicated people on this Forum, and looks almost like the day I bought it in 1980.

tm

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #68 Posted by Raymond Del Tondo on 3 Mar 2007, 12:54 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favourites are easily counted: HP-48GX, HP-41, HP-42S, HP-11C, HP-33E;-)

I'm still developing for the HP-48 (SpeedUI,..)
and HP-41 (INIT module for CY, CCD OS/X, other specialized ROM modules)

The HP that convinced me to enter the 'RPN side of life' was the 33E of a friend,
which he gave me for a few days, and of which I worked through the whole manual.
After that, I was kinda hypnotized by the RPN entry principle!

The HP-41C and the HP-11C were my first two real calcs, the 11C being small,
robust and relatively modern compared to the LED calcs like the 30 or 60 series,
but too limited regarding programming features.

So the 41 was my favourite for many years.

There also was a great user community for the HP-41,
partly organized in clubs like the CCD and PPC.

I was introduced to Saturn assembly with the HP-71B and the Forth/Assembler ROM.
Very powerful machine, but IMHO not very practicable due to the one-line display.

And then the HP-48 came out:-)

Still my favourite programming platform, and the last *real* HP Corvallis RPN/RPL calculator,
with an ENTER bar where it belongs, and rock-solid hardware and OS software.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #69 Posted by Eddie Shore on 3 Mar 2007, 10:41 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favorite is the HP 50g. I am a fan of the 48/49/50 series.

My favorite financial calculator, surprisingly, is the 12c. The 12c is more user friendly than the 17bII

            
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #70 Posted by Howard Owen on 3 Mar 2007, 1:11 p.m.,
in response to message #69 by Eddie Shore

Quote:
My favorite financial calculator, surprisingly, is the 12c. The 12c is more user friendly than the 17bII

That's not suprising, given that the 12C is still a top seller, all these years later. Remarkable.

Regards
Howard

                  
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #71 Posted by Don Shepherd on 3 Mar 2007, 3:28 p.m.,
in response to message #70 by Howard Owen

I think user-friendliness is in the eye of the beholder, like most things. Both the 12c (and its successors) and the 17bii+ are designed for the business guy, not the scientists and HP fanatics like us. It's difficult for me to put on the hat of a "businessman," but if I did, I would imagine that the 17bii+ would be more appealing, especially since I will never program the thing anyhow. Both fit in my pocket easily (without the case), and both can easily do the standard TVM stuff.

Since HP is still selling 'em, both must have enough appeal to make it worth marketing them.

            
HP-12C vs. HP-17BII "friendliness"
Message #72 Posted by Karl Schneider on 3 Mar 2007, 2:46 p.m.,
in response to message #69 by Eddie Shore

Hi, Eddie --

Quote:
My favorite financial calculator, surprisingly, is the 12c. The 12c is more user friendly than the 17bII

Much of the enduring popularity of the venerable HP-12C is due to its classy, unobtrusive look. You do have a good point about user-friendliness, however.

HP's apparent design objective with the HP-32S and HP-17B/BII was a "tidy" face with functions accessed through menus. The face of the HP-17B/BII was paricularly sparse. One might wonder, "Where is everything?"

This approach wasn't entirely popular with users, and I share those sentiments. To find a function, one first has to think what the name of its parent menu is, then enter it using extra keystrokes. On the HP-12C, "what you see is what you get" -- directly.

One egregious example of this "over-compartmentalization" is DSE and ISG on the HP-32S. On the prdecessor HP-15C and HP-11C (to name several) DSE and ISG are printed on the keyboard face. On the HP-32S, one must access these through the "LOOP" menu.

Thus, the HP-32SII was created, making more functions visible and directly accessible via a second shift key. New and previously-missing functionality was added, too. The HP-32SII looks a bit cluttered because it represented a design that "evolved" from a different concept, but it's a much better product, IMO.

-- KS

Edited: 3 Mar 2007, 2:48 p.m.

                  
Re: HP-12C vs. HP-17BII "friendliness"
Message #73 Posted by Eddie Shore on 4 Mar 2007, 10:08 a.m.,
in response to message #72 by Karl Schneider

The HP 17BII could use more shift functions. This may be the one calculator where the keyboard isn't "cluttered" enough.

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #74 Posted by Walter B on 3 Mar 2007, 11:14 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

My favourites vintage calcs (as posted earlier):

25C for its form factor, its keys, its performance and its compactness of design at its time;

42S for its powerful features while keeping RPN.

25C was my first HP. 2007 - 1942 - 16 = 49. Ummh, let's say the truth is well within the standard error of +/- 10% d;-)

      
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #75 Posted by Tizedes Csaba [Hungary] on 5 Mar 2007, 6:04 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Ruben

It's not a question: HP15C (and sometimes HP48SX (no popup windows-that's great) and my first HP: an HP32SII)

Csaba

            
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #76 Posted by Ed Look on 5 Mar 2007, 11:27 a.m.,
in response to message #75 by Tizedes Csaba [Hungary]

Your first HP calc was the 32SII?

What an excellent starting point! I bought one after owning and using the 34C for many years, until it started to show signs of wearing out.

I posted earlier in this thread that the 34C is my absolute favorite one; the 32SII made me feel very good using it as it seemed to be so much like the 34C... and yet seemed also to be an improvement in things like memory capacity and a few other things.

I'll confess that the 34C keeps it place in my heart because i) it was my first one; ii) it has that wonderful crisp-feeling set of keys iii) I love the way ALL Spice series calcs look; and iv) the look of red LEDs. What can I say?

                  
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #77 Posted by buygm on 9 Mar 2007, 8:57 p.m.,
in response to message #76 by Ed Look

HP42s was fantastic.

Believe or not...I do really like the new HP33S also. It really is a bargain. Good menus. The programming is so very quick and easy. What is not all that fun is the single letter variable names...and program names...but as a 32s replacement for about $30...it is indeed great. Also, light weight and comfortable to carry in your shirt pocket.

                        
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #78 Posted by Antonio Maschio (Italy) on 10 Mar 2007, 4:13 a.m.,
in response to message #77 by buygm

buygm wrote:

Quote:
I do really like the new HP33S also. It really is a bargain. Good menus. The programming is so very quick and easy. What is not all that fun is the single letter variable names...and program names...but as a 32s replacement for about $30...it is indeed great. Also, light weight and comfortable to carry in your shirt pocket.

I do agree, in lines of principle, but what can you do with tons of bytes and only 26 labels? It's like having a whole planet to explore and a short life to do it.

-- Antonio

                              
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #79 Posted by buygm on 12 Mar 2007, 11:29 p.m.,
in response to message #78 by Antonio Maschio (Italy)

Re note from Antonio about 33s:

Quote:
I do agree, in lines of principle, but what can you do with tons of bytes and only 26 labels? It's like having a whole planet to explore and a short life to do it.

How true. I entered a couple minor programs with a few subroutines and can't add much else for lack of labels. Anyway...the 50G right now is such a good price, that I'm going to buy it and test it out.

Regarding note from last person about the HP 19bii. Yes. I liked that calculator very much, too.

                  
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #80 Posted by Antonio Maschio (Italy) on 10 Mar 2007, 4:11 a.m.,
in response to message #76 by Ed Look

My first HP was also an HP-32SII, and I agree it's an excellent starting point.

-- Antonio

                        
Re: Your favorite calculator?
Message #81 Posted by Don on 10 Mar 2007, 11:18 p.m.,
in response to message #80 by Antonio Maschio (Italy)

My calcs are nearly all financial....the 19B11 is my favorite. The 41C was my first and I still enjoy using it....the way it feels in my hand. The calc I carry in my shirt pocket every day though is the Aurora FN1000, the schlubby little cheapo made in China. If you are into finance, get one of these 12C emulators for about $25 plus shipping, as they have been discontinued and will soon be history.

Don


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