The Museum of HP Calculators


Base Conversions for the HP-67

This program is Copyright © 1976 by Hewlett-Packard and is used here by permission. This program was originally published in the HP-67 Math Pac 1.

This program is supplied without representation or warranty of any kind. Hewlett-Packard Company and The Museum of HP Calculators therefore assume no responsibility and shall have no liability, consequential or otherwise, of any kind arising from the use of this program material or any part thereof.

Card Labels

Base Conversions

Shift

P?

 

 

 

 

Label

xb

b

B

->xB

xb->xB

Key

A

B

C

D

E

Overview

This program will convert a positive number in base b, Xb, to its equivalent representation in base B, XB. The bases b and B may take on integer values from 2 to 99, inclusive. Inputs to the program are Xb, b, and B; the single output is the value of XB. Input of either base, b or B, may be omitted if its value is 10 since a default value of 10 is assigned to both b and B upon input of xb to key A . If several conversions are to be done between the same two bases, i.e., there are several values of xb for the same b and B, then the bases need not be re-input each time. Once the new value of xb is keyed in, then pressing E will immediately cause the calculation of xB, based on the most recent values for b and B.

The heart of this program is a routine under LBL e which actually converts numbers to and from base 10 representations. If either b or B is equal to 10, this routine is executed just once, and then the program halts displaying xB. If, on the other hand, neither b nor B is 10, then xb is first converted to its decimal representation, x10, and next x10 is converted to xB. Thus the routine is here executed twice.

A number such as 4B616 cannot be represented directly on the display because the display is strictly numeric. Therefore, some convention must be adopted to represent numbers Ra when a > 10. We use the convention of allocating two digit locations for each single character in Ra when a > 10.

For example, 4B616 is represented as 04110616 by our convention (in hexadecimal system,A = 10, B = ll, C = 12, D = 13, E = 14, F = 15). When displayed, this number may appear as 41106 or with an exponent

         4.1106      04

which is interpreted as 4.B6 x 162.

The displayed exponent 4 is for base 10 and only serves to locate the decimal point (in the same manner as for decimal numbers).

When base a > 10 (as in the above example), divide the displayed exponent by 2 to get the true exponent of the number. When the displayed exponent is an odd integer, shift the decimal point of the displayed number one place (to the left or right) and adjust its exponent accordingly to make the true exponent an integer.

For example, the displayed number

         1.112     -03

is interpreted as B.C x 16-2 or 0.BC x 16-1

Remarks

  1. When the magnitude of the number is very large or very small, this program will take a long time to execute.
  2. The program will not give any Error indication for invalid inputs for xb. For example, 9818 will be treated the same as 12018.

Instructions

Step

Instructions

Input Data/Units

Keys

Output Data/Units

1

Load side 1 and side 2.

     

2

To cause input values to be output, set Print/Pause mode.

 

f A

1.00

3

To cancel Print/Pause mode.

 

f A

0.00

 4

Key in number in first base.

xb

A

 

5

(optional) Key in first base. (If omitted, default value of b is 10. )

b

B

 

6

(optional) Key in second base. (If omitted, default value of B is 10.)

B

C

 

7

Calculate number in second base.

 

D

xB

8

To convert another number between the same two bases (from b to B), key in the new xb and find the new xB

xb

E

xB

9

To change either base, go to step 4.    

 

Examples

The following octal numbers (b = 8) are addresses of a segment of a program in an HP2100 minicomputer: 177700, 177735, 177777. What are the values of these addresses in base 10 (B = 10)?

Keystrokes                     Outputs
177700 A 8 B D                      65472.00 ***
177735 E                            65501.00 *** 
177777 E                            65535.00 ***

Find the ten-digit binary representation of PI. (xb = 3.141592654, b = 10, B = 2)

Keystrokes                     Outputs
PI A 2 C D DSP 9                    11.00100100

Convert the following octal numbers (b = 8) into hexadecimal (B = 16): 7.200067 x 8-10, 1.513561778 x 817

Keystrokes                     Outputs
7.200067 EEX CHS 10 A 8 B 
16 C D                              1.130000031-14 ***
                                    (l.D003A x 16-7)
1.513561778 EEX 17 E                1.30214140425 ***
                                    (13.02141404 24
                                    =D.2EE4 x 1612)

The Program

LINE  KEYS    
001  *LBL A     Input Xb (no. in base to be converted)
002   STO E
003   F0?
004   PRT SPC  
005   F0?
006   PRTX
007   1
008   0         Default bases B and b are 10.
009   STO C
010   STO D
011   EEX
012   1
013   2
014   STO 8
015   roll dn
016   roll dn
017   RTN
018  *LBL B     Input base b.
019   STO D
020   F0?
021   PRTX
022   F0?
023   PRT SPC  
024   SF 2
025   RTN
026  *LBL C     Input base B to which Xb is to be converted.
027   STO C
028   F2?
029   GTO 0
030   F0?
031   PRT SPC  
032  *LBL 0
033   F0?
034   PRTX
035   RTN
036  *LBL D     Find XB.
037   RCL C     Save b and B.
038   STO A
039   RCL D
040   STO I
041   1
042   0
043   X!=Y?     Is b = 10?
044   GTO 1     No, try B= 10
045   RCL C     Yes, test B > 10
046   GSB d     (Choose 10 or 100).
047   STO D     Convert.
048   GSB e     Exit.
049   GTO 5
050  *LBL 1     b != 10
051   RCL C     Is B = 10?
052   X!=Y?     No. branch.
053   GTO 2     Yes, test b>10
054   RCL D     (Choose 10 or 100).
055   GSB d
056   STO C
057   GSB e     Convert.
058   GTO 5     Exit.
059  *LBL 2
060   RCL D     Here b != 10, B != 10
061   GSB d
062   STO C     Convert Xb to X10.
063   GSB e
064   RCL B
065   STO E
066   RCL A
067   STO C
068   GSB d     Convert X10 to XB
069   STO D
070   GSB e
071  *LBL 5
072   PRTX      Exit
073   F0?
074   PRT SPC  
075   R/S
076  *LBL d     Subroutine tests input in
077   1         X Register > 10.
078   0         If > 10, returns value 100.
079   STO 7     If <= 10, returns value 10.
080   X<>Y
081   X>Y?
082   EEX
083   1
084   STO x 7
085   RCL 7
086   RTN
087  *LBL e     Main subroutine;
088   0         Actually converts to/from
089   STO 9     base 10.
090   STO B
091   RCL E
092  *LBL 9     Shift right until < 1.
093   1
094   X>Y?
095   GTO 8
096   STO + 9   R0 track of no. of places
097   CLX       shifted (exponent).
098   RCL C
099   ÷
100   STO E
101   GTO 9
102  *LBL 8     On entry, RE contains
103   RCL C     normalized Xb:
104   RCL E     0 < Xb < 1.
105   x
106   STO E
107   EEX
108   4
109   +
110   EEX
111   4
112   -
113   INT
114   RCL B     Build up XB.
115   RCL D
116   x
117   +
118   STO B
119   RCL E
120   EEX
121   4
122   +
123   EEX
124   4
125   -
126   INT
127   RCL E
128   -
129   ABS
130   STO E
131   1
132   STO - 9   Do not build mantissa
133   RCL B     beyond 10^12
134   RCL 8
135   X<=Y?
136   GTO 4
137   RCL E
138   X!=0?
139   GTO 8
140  *LBL 4
141   RCL D
142   RCL 9
143   YX
144   RCL B
145   x         XB
146   STO B
147   RTN
148  *LBL E     Input new x for same b and B.
149   STO E
150   F0?
151   PRT SPC  
152   F0?
153   PRTX
154   RCL A     Last value of B.
155   STO C     Last value of b.
156   RCL I
157   STO D
158   GTO D
159  *LBL a     Print toggle.
160   F0?
161   GTO 0
162   SF 0
163   1
164   RTN
165  *LBL 0
166   CF 0
167   0
168   RTN

Register Use

R7  10, 100
R8  1012
R9  Used
A   B
B   XB
C   B, used
D   b, used
E   Xb, used
I   b

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