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Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
01-03-2018, 10:09 AM
Post: #1
Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
So, after a bit of trouble I got the hpmuseum usb set (version 2017? how do I know the version that I have?).

The point is, I did only briefly checked it.

I know that the old forum archives are in PDF (so one sees what was really on the page) but I often find content faster with google until the archives are online.

I see a lot of manual that for the moment are not so appealing to me aside as "backup for history". This because I do not know whether the contents can be interesting or not. A manual is normally interesting when one has the device that the manual describe but there are exceptions.

Therefore, from the hpmuseum document set, what would you recommend to read and why? Independently if one has the device mentioned by the document.
Of course assumed that one is interested in RPN, RPL, programming and math.

For example I guess the 15C advanced functions handbook can be interesting, although I did not read it yet.

PS: if such a topic was discussed already, please link it to me because I did not find any good result.

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01-03-2018, 10:26 AM (This post was last modified: 01-03-2018 10:58 AM by salvomic.)
Post: #2
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(01-03-2018 10:09 AM)pier4r Wrote:  So, after a bit of trouble I got the hpmuseum usb set (version 2017? how do I know the version that I have?).
...
a mine of information!

Quote:For example I guess the 15C advanced functions handbook can be interesting, although I did not read it yet.
...

After that, HP released the Advantage pac (advanced functions module) for HP41CX, if I'm not in error...
A book to read, Pier, I think to read it soon. For now I read again the 15C manual as well I'm reading that of 41CX. We can understand many things reading those old manuals, with a lot of solutions, tricks and tips. They could seem too "simple" (or also actually tricky) nowadays, considering calculators (like the Prime or DM42) with a lot of advanced functions, graphics, connectivity and so on, very impressive, but this power becomes from those tricks and tips and solutions.

I would like to thank MoHPC for the usb set! Very amazing.

Salvo

∫aL√0mic (IT9CLU), HP Prime 50g 41CX 71b 42s 12C 15C - DM42 WP34s :: Prime Soft. Lib
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01-03-2018, 11:34 AM
Post: #3
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(01-03-2018 10:26 AM)salvomic Wrote:  
(01-03-2018 10:09 AM)pier4r Wrote:  So, after a bit of trouble I got the hpmuseum usb set (version 2017? how do I know the version that I have?).
...
a mine of information!

Quote:For example I guess the 15C advanced functions handbook can be interesting, although I did not read it yet.
...

After that, HP released the Advantage pac (advanced functions module) for HP41CX, if I'm not in error...
A book to read, Pier, I think to read it soon. For now I read again the 15C manual as well I'm reading that of 41CX. We can understand many things reading those old manuals, with a lot of solutions, tricks and tips. They could seem too "simple" (or also actually tricky) nowadays, considering calculators (like the Prime or DM42) with a lot of advanced functions, graphics, connectivity and so on, very impressive, but this power becomes from those tricks and tips and solutions.

I would like to thank MoHPC for the usb set! Very amazing.

Salvo

At least once we had manuals, nowadays what? A catalog of functions?

Greetings,
    Massimo

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01-03-2018, 11:42 AM
Post: #4
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(01-03-2018 11:34 AM)Massimo Gnerucci Wrote:  At least once we had manuals, nowadays what? A catalog of functions?

Definitely!

A manual is always a book, and we read it also without a calculator, only to understand how it works...
However the new Catalog in the Prime is very impressive in the last beta, you choose a function, press Help and you've got a "little peace of manual", good almost to remember how it does...

∫aL√0mic (IT9CLU), HP Prime 50g 41CX 71b 42s 12C 15C - DM42 WP34s :: Prime Soft. Lib
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01-03-2018, 01:07 PM
Post: #5
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(01-03-2018 10:26 AM)salvomic Wrote:  After that, HP released the Advantage pac (advanced functions module) for HP41CX, if I'm not in error...
A book to read, Pier, I think to read it soon. For now I read again the 15C manual as well I'm reading that of 41CX. We can understand many things reading those old manuals, with a lot of solutions, tricks and tips. They could seem too "simple" (or also actually tricky) nowadays, considering calculators (like the Prime or DM42) with a lot of advanced functions, graphics, connectivity and so on, very impressive, but this power becomes from those tricks and tips and solutions.

I would like to thank MoHPC for the usb set! Very amazing.

Salvo

What I mean with interesting manuals are those manuals that have also digressions on a topic. Or manuals that explain the topic not only in terms of keypresses (or code). Those are not so common.

For example the best explanation read by me about object oriented programming was in the manual of turbo pascal 5.5 (free available on internet).

I am not that interested in those manuals that "ok now let's explain how to use trigonometry functions. Let's go through 43 examples." I find it useful if you have the device (or for history).

As example: as far as I read the manual of the hp 42 (when I compared the free42 with the 506w in terms of usability), aside from using it with the free42, it has nothing special inside, like, dunno "the algorithm behind this function is: ... ", or "particular applications of this function". It is what it is, a manual.

Said that, I hope the 15C advanced functions handbook would contain some digressions a la hp journal, like "how a function works" or "why this algorithm and not another". Actually I need just to read it.

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01-03-2018, 01:36 PM
Post: #6
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(01-03-2018 01:07 PM)pier4r Wrote:  Said that, I hope the 15C advanced functions handbook would contain some digressions a la hp journal, like "how a function works" or "why this algorithm and not another". Actually I need just to read it.

HP Owners Handbook of the 15C explains also "how a function works and why this algorithm is better than another..."

∫aL√0mic (IT9CLU), HP Prime 50g 41CX 71b 42s 12C 15C - DM42 WP34s :: Prime Soft. Lib
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01-03-2018, 03:22 PM
Post: #7
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
@pier4r - Read Bill Wickes's book "HP-48 Insights Part I (GX Version)", included in the MoHPC Doc set. Although you may already "know" RPL, I guarantee this book will provide very useful insights and you will never see RPL the same way again. I think this is by far the best book to understand both how RPL works and also how to use it, better than any other book or manual. It does not include advanced topics like SysRPL or Machine Language, but it does include some of the (48 series) tools, such as solvers, etc.

The book does not include 49/49+/50 specific features, but is still very good for anyone wanting to learn RPL or learn to use it better.

There is a zip file on hpcalc.org that includes all the program examples in the book.

--Bob Prosperi
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01-03-2018, 04:35 PM
Post: #8
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
Any of the software manuals (for the models that have the code printed in the book, and not on mag cards, ROM modules, etc.) if you want some nice algorithms and programs to adapt to your model of choice.

Ditto for the users' library programs, if you don't mind deciphering the occasionally tricky scanned handwriting and photocopied printouts.

17BII manual, appendix B, if you're implementing financial functions on a scientific and want to crib the formulas and algorithms.

"HP 42S Triangle Solutions" if you want a really nice and intuitive triangle solver for 42S.

The EduCalc catalogs and HP brochures are usually an enjoyable read.
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01-03-2018, 05:49 PM
Post: #9
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
I like to read books like Ray Depew one (hp48 graphics) or Jim donnelly one like (hp48 Toolkit or the hp48 handbook or again hp48 database).

In my opinion these books really unleashed the power of RPL along with hp48 insight book that Bob mentioned.

I think these books are still not in the museum set...

However there are very usefull books in the set. apart from the user guides i usually like to study the USER SOLUTION BOOKS like the hp41 ones. The algorithms are Always very effective.

Ciao

Giancarlo
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03-06-2018, 10:46 AM
Post: #10
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
Reading the so much mentioned (here in the forum and also in the hp journal) "15c advanced functions handbook"

It is almost a math textbook on some topics disguised as calculator manual. Really interesting! It is also a nice source of ideas for the project here: http://www.hpmuseum.org/forum/thread-10271.html )

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03-06-2018, 03:46 PM
Post: #11
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(03-06-2018 10:46 AM)pier4r Wrote:  Reading the so much mentioned (here in the forum and also in the hp journal) "15c advanced functions handbook"

It is almost a math textbook on some topics disguised as calculator manual. Really interesting!

Yes, absolutely!
I enjoy revisiting these vintage books and keep rediscovering things that I have forgotten long ago and also other things that I just can't remember to have read before as well.

Jose Mesquita
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03-07-2018, 07:38 PM
Post: #12
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(01-03-2018 10:09 AM)pier4r Wrote:  For example I guess the 15C advanced functions handbook can be interesting, although I did not read it yet.
The advanced functions handbook was recreated from scratch for the 15C-LE. You can find it here: http://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03308725.pdf
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03-08-2018, 02:23 AM
Post: #13
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(01-03-2018 10:09 AM)pier4r Wrote:  I see a lot of manual that for the moment are not so appealing to me aside as "backup for history". This because I do not know whether the contents can be interesting or not. A manual is normally interesting when one has the device that the manual describe but there are exceptions.

I find all the manuals are important to me, especially when I don't own the calculator. When I come across programs written for other calculators that I want to convert to the DM42, HP-35s or HP Prime I read the manual for the source calculator and it helps me understand the program better and makes conversion easier. Plus it's just fun to see the historical slant on the writing of those manuals.

Tom L

DM42 SN: 00025 (Beta)
SN: 00221 (Production)
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03-08-2018, 02:31 AM
Post: #14
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(03-07-2018 07:38 PM)David Hayden Wrote:  
(01-03-2018 10:09 AM)pier4r Wrote:  For example I guess the 15C advanced functions handbook can be interesting, although I did not read it yet.
The advanced functions handbook was recreated from scratch for the 15C-LE. You can find it here: httpc://www.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c03308725.pdf

Sure, the Advanced Functions Hanbook is a very good start. I remember back in the day studying it after back from work, what a pleasure, brings me back good memories...

I can recommend, if you are a RPL guy, the Bill Wickes HP28S insights, a pleasure to read too. The book is fantastic and it's a good intro to the RPL world.

You can use an emulator or go to TAS and find one, it is not expensive, but pay attention on the battery door area, normally it is broken , but there are ways to overcome this problem.

I do recommend you to acquire a 28S whenever possible.

Cheers
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03-08-2018, 03:07 AM
Post: #15
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(03-08-2018 02:23 AM)toml_12953 Wrote:  ... Plus it's just fun to see the historical slant on the writing of those manuals.

Exactly, you said it all...
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03-08-2018, 11:26 PM
Post: #16
RE: Reading suggestions from the HPmuseum document set
(03-08-2018 02:31 AM)Jlouis Wrote:  Sure, the Advanced Functions Hanbook is a very good start. I remember back in the day studying it after back from work, what a pleasure, brings me back good memories...

I can recommend, if you are a RPL guy, the Bill Wickes HP28S insights, a pleasure to read too. The book is fantastic and it's a good intro to the RPL world.

You can use an emulator or go to TAS and find one, it is not expensive, but pay attention on the battery door area, normally it is broken , but there are ways to overcome this problem.

I do recommend you to acquire a 28S whenever possible.

Cheers

I, too, have fond memories of the 28S, it was my introduction to RPL and was a real technical marvel in its day. Now, however, being used to the HP 50 and all the great libraries available for it, the 28 seems rather constricting, like trying to fit into the jeans I could wear in 1987. (!)

I second Bob's recommendation of Wickes' HP-48 Insights Part I (GX Version), as it has information and programming techniques that are still relevant today.

John
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