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How do you like the HP 34C?
11-30-2017, 02:26 AM
Post: #21
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
(11-29-2017 07:20 PM)Dave Frederickson Wrote:  Interesting, neither MoHPC nor HP-Collection recognize the Spike series.

The joint name is well covered in Wlodek's book, though it doesn't clarify, and I never realized, the SPICE = E and SPIKE = C division. Makes sense to me. The only other division candidate I've thought of was Technical vs. Finance models.

Internal HP papers have also been seen with both names, so they definitely were both used.

Thanks Sylvain.

--Bob Prosperi
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11-30-2017, 04:47 AM
Post: #22
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
Thanks for all the feedback folks!
How would you compare the build quality of the 67 vs the 41? They both look pretty solid in photos, but I have never held any of these models.
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11-30-2017, 07:27 AM (This post was last modified: 11-30-2017 07:42 AM by Thomas Okken.)
Post: #23
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
(11-30-2017 04:47 AM)Trond Wrote:  How would you compare the build quality of the 67 vs the 41? They both look pretty solid in photos, but I have never held any of these models.

I'm probably not the best qualified to comment on HP-41 durability, but, for what it's worth: I used the 41 as my everyday calculators from 1979 until about 1989. I bought an HP-41C in the first week you could buy them, and replaced it with a 41CX about five years later. In 10 years of using these calculators, I never had any trouble with them. The cases were sturdy, the keyboards were crisp and reliable, and I never experienced any kind of failure whatsoever.

Regarding the HP-67, I never owned one back when they were the top of the line, but I got one on eBay a few years ago. It appears to have been used heavily, but treated gently. The yellow and blue markings on the faceplate have not rubbed off, but the f, h, CLx, and R/S keys feel a bit mushy compared to rest of the rest of the keyboard. All the keys work fine, you don't have to push hard on any of them nor do any of them bounce. And the case feels solid as a rock, it doesn't flex or creak at all. If it weren't for the fact that calculators have become so much more capable in the 40 years since my 67 was built, I could see myself using this unit as my daily calculator even today.
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12-01-2017, 06:09 AM
Post: #24
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
I ordered a HP 41CV in good shape, which comes with a manual and carrying case. Will let you know how I like it Smile
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12-03-2017, 01:11 AM
Post: #25
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
BTW I am just curious here: how do you know if the 34c is soldered or clamped? (without opening it)
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12-03-2017, 01:26 AM
Post: #26
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
The 34C beats the 67/97 if only because it has continuous memory. It's a huge pain in the behind when your 67/97 fully resets each time you turn it off, and I don't think it's safe to plug it in and unplug it when it's on.

I am thinking of getting that Panamatic mod for my 67 just for the continuous memory. I feel I'd use it a lot more often if I didn't have to reprogram the whole thing every time I turned it off.
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12-03-2017, 04:15 AM
Post: #27
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
(12-03-2017 01:11 AM)Trond Wrote:  BTW I am just curious here: how do you know if the 34c is soldered or clamped? (without opening it)

From various posts in this forum the most common way is to weigh it. With the batteries installed the original press-fit version weighs about 220-230 g. The newer soldered version is lighter and weighs around 170-180 g.

Another member writes the following:
"Pick one key (calculator ON or OFF), perhaps [ENTER] key and slowly press it till it "clicks" and stops. If the key's upper face (not the top of the key) hides itself in a way the top face almost reaches the keyboard level, then it is a solderless unit. If the key moves just a little bit and the upper face keeps half of it hidden and half appearing, then it is a soldered unit. This is because the solderless units have a single flex circuit that "plays the role" of keyboard contacts, circuit trails and IC's connectors, and the bubble caps for each key are somehow "far" from the keys contacts. The soldered units use metal caps almost like the ones used in the HP41 (and HP75C/D and HP71B) for each key, and their "moving range" is a lot smaller."
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12-03-2017, 05:42 AM
Post: #28
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
(12-03-2017 04:15 AM)Steve Simpkin Wrote:  
(12-03-2017 01:11 AM)Trond Wrote:  BTW I am just curious here: how do you know if the 34c is soldered or clamped? (without opening it)

From various posts in this forum the most common way is to weigh it. With the batteries installed the original press-fit version weighs about 220-230 g. The newer soldered version is lighter and weighs around 170-180 g.

Another member writes the following:
"Pick one key (calculator ON or OFF), perhaps [ENTER] key and slowly press it till it "clicks" and stops. If the key's upper face (not the top of the key) hides itself in a way the top face almost reaches the keyboard level, then it is a solderless unit. If the key moves just a little bit and the upper face keeps half of it hidden and half appearing, then it is a soldered unit. This is because the solderless units have a single flex circuit that "plays the role" of keyboard contacts, circuit trails and IC's connectors, and the bubble caps for each key are somehow "far" from the keys contacts. The soldered units use metal caps almost like the ones used in the HP41 (and HP75C/D and HP71B) for each key, and their "moving range" is a lot smaller."
OK, but how about serial numbers? Are the later ones all soldered?
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12-03-2017, 06:23 AM
Post: #29
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
(12-03-2017 05:42 AM)Trond Wrote:  OK, but how about serial numbers? Are the later ones all soldered?

I haven't found any posts that claim you could tell by the serial number although I did see someone mention that the change to soldered ICs was made sometime in 1982. Here is an example where the poster did not think looking at the serial number would help.
http://www.hpmuseum.org/cgi-sys/cgiwrap/...ead=132269
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12-03-2017, 06:31 AM
Post: #30
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
(12-03-2017 06:23 AM)Steve Simpkin Wrote:  
(12-03-2017 05:42 AM)Trond Wrote:  OK, but how about serial numbers? Are the later ones all soldered?

I haven't found any posts that claim you could tell by the serial number although I did see someone mention that the change to soldered ICs was made sometime in 1982. Here is an example where the poster did not think looking at the serial number would help.
http://www.hpmuseum.org/cgi-sys/cgiwrap/...ead=132269

Many thanks for the info!
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12-08-2017, 12:20 PM (This post was last modified: 12-08-2017 12:22 PM by AndiGer.)
Post: #31
RE: How do you like the HP 34C?
My HP 34C is a soldered one - but after repair. HP Germany didn't tell exactly what they changed in mArch 1982 but told the calculator is lighter after repair due to keyboard modifications.


Attached File(s)
.pdf  HP repaired.pdf (Size: 699.95 KB / Downloads: 25)
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