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Code formatting messed up...
11-12-2018, 10:55 PM
Post: #21
RE: Code formatting messed up...
If you like the look of the old Courier font (or want it for Postscript compatibility), the TeX Gyre Cursor font is a good substitute for Nimbus Mono L, as it has the same metrics and greater coverage, including the most common Greek characters (including the ones used as technical symbols).

On Debian (and probably Ubuntu and Mint?), the fonts-texgyre package installs the OpenType format of the TeX Gyre font family, and the tex-gyre package installs the Type 1 format of the TeX Gyre font family. As you can probably guess from the name, they are intended to support the TeX typesetting system, but are also suitable for general use.

Another option is to use the Courier New font as used by Microsoft Windows, but that has different metrics. On Debian, it is installed by the ttf-mscorefonts-installer package.

— Ian Abbott
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11-13-2018, 06:27 PM
Post: #22
RE: Code formatting messed up...
(11-12-2018 07:49 PM)SammysHP Wrote:  
(11-12-2018 04:05 PM)Jonathan Busby Wrote:  I'm hesitant to issue an "apt-get update && apt-get upgrade && apt-get dist-upgrade" as I'm afraid my system will be borked. Maybe I can just upgrade the fonts package.

A bit off-topic, but you should update your system as often as possible. Not only does that fix security issues early, it also makes it easier to determine the source of any errors after updating (which should be a really rare case). Debian is rather stable, so updates fix only minor issues. Similar distros like Ubuntu/Mint tend to include more bleeding-edge versions of common packages, but big issues after updates are rare as well.

Well, I've been running out of RAM, although I do have a cron job that executes every 15 minutes and backs up my home directory to an external drive. The reason I've been running out of RAM is that this Linux system had a Linux Mint install with a ZFS root and I experienced a kernel panic in the ZFS driver stack and I'm still trying to recover my data ( note to others : if you're using ZFS on Linux, be careful with the "dedup" option ). I don't want to reboot because then I'll have to re-install a bunch of tools and other software.

Quote:Partial upgrades (running "apt-get update" before "apt-get install" without "apt-get dist-upgrade") on the other hand may cause some trouble (binaries linked against different versions, moved/renamed files etc).

Well, in my case, I don't want to upgrade yet as I'm running out of RAM and I'm afraid that an update may use up too much memory in the ramdisk and cause this system to bork itself.

Jonathan
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11-13-2018, 06:33 PM
Post: #23
RE: Code formatting messed up...
(11-12-2018 10:55 PM)ijabbott Wrote:  If you like the look of the old Courier font (or want it for Postscript compatibility), the TeX Gyre Cursor font is a good substitute for Nimbus Mono L, as it has the same metrics and greater coverage, including the most common Greek characters (including the ones used as technical symbols).

On Debian (and probably Ubuntu and Mint?), the fonts-texgyre package installs the OpenType format of the TeX Gyre font family, and the tex-gyre package installs the Type 1 format of the TeX Gyre font family. As you can probably guess from the name, they are intended to support the TeX typesetting system, but are also suitable for general use.

Another option is to use the Courier New font as used by Microsoft Windows, but that has different metrics. On Debian, it is installed by the ttf-mscorefonts-installer package.

Thanks for the tip! Big Grin I installed the fonts-texgyre package and it fixed the problems with the bold alphas and other problems associated with displaying Greek characters.

Jonathan
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11-15-2018, 05:41 PM
Post: #24
RE: Code formatting messed up...
(11-13-2018 06:27 PM)Jonathan Busby Wrote:  
(11-12-2018 07:49 PM)SammysHP Wrote:  A bit off-topic, but you should update your system as often as possible. Not only does that fix security issues early, it also makes it easier to determine the source of any errors after updating (which should be a really rare case). Debian is rather stable, so updates fix only minor issues. Similar distros like Ubuntu/Mint tend to include more bleeding-edge versions of common packages, but big issues after updates are rare as well.

Well, I've been running out of RAM, although I do have a cron job that executes every 15 minutes and backs up my home directory to an external drive. The reason I've been running out of RAM is that this Linux system had a Linux Mint install with a ZFS root and I experienced a kernel panic in the ZFS driver stack and I'm still trying to recover my data ( note to others : if you're using ZFS on Linux, be careful with the "dedup" option ). I don't want to reboot because then I'll have to re-install a bunch of tools and other software.

Quote:Partial upgrades (running "apt-get update" before "apt-get install" without "apt-get dist-upgrade") on the other hand may cause some trouble (binaries linked against different versions, moved/renamed files etc).

Well, in my case, I don't want to upgrade yet as I'm running out of RAM and I'm afraid that an update may use up too much memory in the ramdisk and cause this system to bork itself.

Jonathan

Don't ask what the uptime on this Linux Mint Live session is or you might very well be amazed or maybe disgusted, or both! Tongue ( spoiler )

Jonathan
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