The Museum of HP Calculators

HP Forum Archive 21

[ Return to Index | Top of Index ]

rolinychupetin hp50
Message #1 Posted by lbintz4 on 9 Dec 2013, 12:48 a.m.

By chance a fellow who works for me recently gave me his Dad's mint hp48g complete with all manuals including the advanced users guide. Normally I am Beam prop or mathematica type of guy but I did write some simple stuff for my now long lost hp 28-s.

I became intrigued and have spent more then a few hours & plane rides working through the manuals. So far I wrote a couple simple programs to entertain & seemingly convert my 12year old to RPN!, they pop up a menu, ask her by name for input values , run a calculation with local variables assigned to the stack pulls and then tag an output value. She now borrows the HP to use the RPN style key strokes for her geometry homework. I can't be happier :)

In any case I came across a rather brilliant set of utube videos by rolinychupetin on the HP 49g+->( seems close enough for the 48 series as well). So far have just worked through the first two but they were entertaining enough to plunk down 75 dollars on an Hp50 from new egg just to see the differences between the calculators. Personally I think the series is well worth the watch and really recommend it. Also I thought 75 dollars was a decent price and worth passing along. Haven't received yet but the enter key seems weak and lonely in the bottom corner, not where I would have put it for two handed use..

Curious to see how the Hp50 compares to the 48g for my occasional daily use & writing small programs for simple stuff like converting % weight of chromophore loading into number density & some thin film optics lab number crunching during running discussions with my colleagues.

Lou

      
Re: rolinychupetin hp50
Message #2 Posted by Chris Pem10 on 9 Dec 2013, 10:29 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by lbintz4

I also introduced my 9 year old daughter to RPN and she seemed to pick it up very quickly. Currently her class is studying order of operations; "picking the equations apart" via RPN and simplifying them is both fun and intutive for us.

I mentioned this before; HP should contract someone of Rolinychupetin's talent to produce an entire series of videos showcasing the capabilities of their calculators.

1. Have users submit/vote on what types of problems they'd like.
2. HP intern with a clear voice uploads a screen capture of the solution.
3. Sell more calcs.
4. Repeat.

And don't forget that your new 50g can run native c code on that arm processor. I've never experemented much past compiling a simple program or two, so I cannot speak for its usefullness. Just google hpgcc.

Edited: 9 Dec 2013, 10:51 a.m.

            
Re: rolinychupetin hp50
Message #3 Posted by lbintz4 on 9 Dec 2013, 3:03 p.m.,
in response to message #2 by Chris Pem10

You know that is exactly it; I actually fear the Texas Instruments/education admin standardization process has taken the soul completely out of science/math education in the US. Where is their room for human curiosity when math/science is akin to fueling your car at the gas station? Follow directions, place answers on sheet repeat.. Really? In other words rather than teach the core concepts and then force the kids to take that concept and apply ( with whatever intuition, calculator or program makes sense to them, it has become Army basic training, open, punch buttons, close, move to next topic; sort of like living in a Module ii program!

In case you think I am being overly harsh, consider this example. My son always had a predilection for math and science and luckily went through an excellent EAP program in his elementary years (and I did what I could to feed his interest). He learned mostly on his own in middle and high school and is just completing his first quarter at Caltech in Pasedena this year. Caltech requires a rigorous series of five problems/four hour long honor code placement tests AFTER acceptance in Math, Chemistry, & Physics. A few students actually test out of few of the core classes; he managed to easily test out of all of them.

How is that possible? Why is he so different in current understanding compared to his peers? Well for example when he was 15 and a sophomore in high school he was in AP Calculus A/B & I was concerned that it would be a bit boring for him as over the summer to amuse himself he had already studied and worked through the core principles of integrals and differentiation, so while riding in the car I asked him,

"Hey, have they given you any extra credit problems to work on so you aren't bored?"

"no, they don't have any to speak of"

" So what are you doing to entertain yourself during class, help others when asked?"

" Well sometimes, but, I am working through the appendix in the back, it is on "Calculus by proof". You know Daddy, that's how they teach it at Caltech"

So besides my surprise at this young looking fifteen year old talking about teaching himself proof based Calculus, it struck a nerve, how many other kids are out there on the edge of diving into meat of science and technology yet are being marginalized by this standardized methodology of rinse and repeat? I would argue quite a few as even those prepared for a Caltech like university experience are as a group, basically on unfamiliar ground when it comes to thinking in a logical yet intuitive fashion, this is in my opinion a harsh reflection on the general state of modern education.

Lou

      
Re: rolinychupetin hp50
Message #4 Posted by Peter Murphy (Livermore) on 9 Dec 2013, 1:10 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by lbintz4

Those tutorials, by L.R. Linares, are collected here:

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLB885FA3ADF2BAB01

They are meticulously constructed -- models of what YouTube videos can do.


[ Return to Index | Top of Index ]

Go back to the main exhibit hall