The Museum of HP Calculators

HP Forum Archive 17

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Texas Instruments Nspire
Message #1 Posted by Joerg Woerner on 9 Mar 2007, 9:30 p.m.

Today is the official web announcement of the TI-Nspire to coincide with the T3 International Conference in Chicago.

http://www.ti-nspire.com/tools/nspire/index.html

Regards, Joerg

      
Re: Texas Instruments Nspire
Message #2 Posted by Don Shepherd on 9 Mar 2007, 11:35 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Joerg Woerner

Wow!

Remember how the Macintosh rewrote all the rules of what a personal computer should be in 1984? Looks like TI is doing it for calculators today. This will be interesting.

            
Re: Texas Instruments Nspire
Message #3 Posted by Howard Owen on 10 Mar 2007, 12:42 a.m.,
in response to message #2 by Don Shepherd

Quote:
Remember how the Macintosh rewrote all the rules of what a personal computer should be in 1984? Looks like TI is doing it for calculators today. This will be interesting.

It strikes me that a reinvention of the calculator is long overdue. This thing looks interesting. I'll reserve judgement until I get my hands on one, however. 8)

Regards,
Howard

            
Re: Texas Instruments Nspire
Message #4 Posted by Les Wright on 11 Mar 2007, 3:26 a.m.,
in response to message #2 by Don Shepherd

I am particularly impressed that the model in the introductory video is a teenage girl.

I am surrounded by women my age who not only think my calculator fetish is a bit weird but who clearly were educated in the days when math and science education was very much a boys' club. That said, I just read in the paper here that one of the highest performing schools here on standardized tests in math is a Catholic girls' school.

I really do hope that things are changing for the better. Disparities in numeracy based on gender are nothing to be proud of.

Les

                  
girls and math
Message #5 Posted by Don Shepherd on 11 Mar 2007, 8:52 a.m.,
in response to message #4 by Les Wright

It is changing, Les, and that is good. I teach middle school (ages 11 to 13) math. In my classes, I have observed that most of the mathematically brighter students are girls. And they are not afraid to demonstrate their knowledge, which is different from past generations. I think more teachers today, than in the past, recognize that ability in math is not a gender thing. Even when I was programming for a living, I saw that there were as many good female programmers as male, although their total number was fewer.

                        
Re: girls and math
Message #6 Posted by Dia C. Tran on 20 Mar 2007, 8:19 a.m.,
in response to message #5 by Don Shepherd

The Mac changed the way people use computers from computing to something else (desktop publishing etc..) although the computers still have to do serious computing inside. May be the Nspire does the same thing that people will rarely use the calculator for calculating but for something else.


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