The Museum of HP Calculators

HP Forum Archive 14

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HP33s Are All Gone!
Message #1 Posted by J.C. Randerson on 9 Apr 2004, 5:03 p.m.

The three HP33s I sold at cost + shipping to help other students needing one for the FIT/PE are all spoken for. The flood of emails I'm getting now are simply being deleted. Best of luck on another source.

J.C. Randerson

      
Re: HP33s Are All Gone!
Message #2 Posted by Driscoll on 9 Apr 2004, 6:53 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by J.C. Randerson

The good news for HP (and for RPN calculators generally) is that the 33S seems to be selling well. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the demand for this model is substantially greater than the available supply.

But the apparent market success of the 33S comes at a price. It seems likely that the demand for the 33S is driven, to a large degree, by the new NCEES calculator rules. But these rules also ban the 48GII and 49G+.

So it is quite possible that the 33S is "cannibalizing" the sales of HP's higher-end models. Many engineers and surveyors that would have bought the 48GII or the 49G+ for NCEES exams are getting in line for the 33S instead.

            
Re: HP33s Are All Gone!
Message #3 Posted by Andrés C. Rodríguez (Argentina) on 9 Apr 2004, 10:30 p.m.,
in response to message #2 by Driscoll

As the price of the 33s is rather low (just a little more than a dinner for two at Denny's, I mean), any professional engineer (who, by the way, is paying much more for a exam) will not consider its purchase as a reason for not buying a superior instrument IF she/he feels such instrument IS WORTH using for her/his professional performance.

Whether the HP current "graphing" calculators deserve such qualification is an open question, at least for me. I would endorse a 41/42 rather than a 48xx/49xx; but that is just my personal opinion.

                  
Re: HP33s Are All Gone!
Message #4 Posted by Driscoll on 10 Apr 2004, 1:35 a.m.,
in response to message #3 by Andrés C. Rodríguez (Argentina)

Your point is valid. But for many professional engineers today, the *only* reason to invest in a high-powered calculator is for use on licensing exams. Many younger engineers would be unable to imagine any other situation where it would be necessary to do serious number-crunching without a computer. In such cases, the 33S will replace the 48 or 49, not supplement it.

                        
Re: HP33s Are All Gone!
Message #5 Posted by Andrés C. Rodríguez (Argentina) on 10 Apr 2004, 8:14 a.m.,
in response to message #4 by Driscoll

Thank you for your comment.

If, as you said, "... the *only* reason to invest in a high-powered calculator is for use on licensing exams..." (I assume it is so), then high-end calculators will have little success indeed.

But that may be "right" because for they to sell well, they should offer real and perceivable value.

On the other hand, the fact that the NCEES rules are the ones that shape the market is something I don't feel comfortable with, but that is difficult for me to evaluate from this far. In some manner, those "niche" rules are shaping the global offer for scientific calculators, as no manufacturer today will develop a model that cannot be successful in markets as important as the USA.

                              
"who R we kidding?"
Message #6 Posted by Ron Ross on 12 Apr 2004, 9:23 a.m.,
in response to message #5 by Andrés C. Rodríguez (Argentina)

Two calculators will be bought.

Students will buy a graphics, because it is far superior to a pocket calculator for most Engineering problems and if they do not own or buy math software for a PC or laptop.

In their Senior year, when they discover that their precious graphics calculator cannot be used, they will buy a pocket calculator. A wise student may have already bought the Hp9G (one of the few graphics specifically allowed on the exam), but most will assume it to be RPN, it isn't. Most engineering students today do not use RPN. Sad, but true. Most stay with the Ti they purchased in High school. And this is their tool until it is stolen, breaks down, or doesn't have the horsepower needed ie Ti-83 for an EE would be replaced as a sophomore or junior. But most Ti users will stay Ti users.

Yes the 33s will sell well, but only because it has no competetion in the Pocket calculator market. If Ti were to release a clone Hp27s without IR (ie Ti-68 with 8+ K RAM and four letter variables, it would stomp on an Hp33s in the market place.

                                    
Re: "who R we kidding?"
Message #7 Posted by GE (France) on 12 Apr 2004, 7:42 p.m.,
in response to message #6 by Ron Ross

The TI68 is not programmable in the classical sense, only stores formulas. I won't go into finding which TI model is the best for reincarnation a-la HP33S.

                                          
Re: "who R we kidding?"
Message #8 Posted by Ron Ross on 13 Apr 2004, 9:49 a.m.,
in response to message #7 by GE (France)

I merely used the closest Ti calculator to an Hp27s that could be morphed into the more sophisticated Hp27s, if more RAM were used and more variables made available with some file type system for numerous programs. Actually the Ti-68 also could handle a 5X5 matrix (very crudely, no great amount of matrix functions).

I still consider the Hp27s to be superior to the Hp33s in nearly every way minus the RPN interface. AND I suspect one could use the 27s on the US NCEES exam (technically, it would be cheating) without a problem as it is not specifically mentioned and looks very simple and shows no alpha capability on the keypad.


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