The Museum of HP Calculators

HP Forum Archive 01

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Scientific calculators
Message #1 Posted by Bill Holmes on 2 Nov 1999, 9:03 a.m.

Does HP have any plans to come out with a new scientific calculator? I want to replace my HP42s but the HP-32IIís keyboard looks overly complicated. Also, I have looked at the TI calculators and although I have been using HP calculators for 15 years, I am getting the impression that RPN is obsolete. Does anyone have an opinion?

Thank you

      
Re: Scientific calculators
Message #2 Posted by Dave on 2 Nov 1999, 9:25 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Bill Holmes

RPN is still the easiest technique once mastered, but less of a value when you have a graphical big calc where the entire expression can be viewed.

RPN is best for a small form factor calc with primarily a stack or numerical display.

I think HP is still going to develop new calcs, but it may take a while for them to get back on the right track again after ceasing development for so many years. Hopefully they make one as powerful & useful as the 42S (unfortunately probably not this year....)

      
Re: Scientific calculators - RPN obsolete ? - no
Message #3 Posted by Reinhard Hawel on 2 Nov 1999, 1:08 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Bill Holmes

RPN isn't obsolete as long as you (and other guys) use it.

I believe, it's the fastest method of entering short calculations and it's stack architecture (especially with an unlimited stack) allows for faster execution of programs (on a comparable machine). If you enter your expressions for example on a HP48 you'll even have a command stack (the whole expression lies on the stack then. This is a common practice for me. I enter the calculations in quptes with the space key between the operands and push enter twice when I'm finished.

So I have a copy of my calculation on the stack and can repeat similar calculations rather fast or correct some input errors.

I got used to RPN after using TI calcs for years, then I bought a HP-71 (which isn't a RPN calc). I bought then a HP-48SX and use it til now.

I feel it's much to strong for my daily needs, but it's a very comfortable tool, when I have to do some programming.

Naturally, I use my BASIC programmable 71B, when there are really important things to do :-) (no flames please)

            
Re: Scientific calculators - RPN obsolete ? - no
Message #4 Posted by Salvatore Sidoti on 13 Nov 1999, 6:51 a.m.,
in response to message #3 by Reinhard Hawel

Never, once you have used HP RPN for over 20 years you realise as they (HP) did that it's a winner. I might also add that if you're doing simple or even complex calculations in succession, using HP RPN (where you don't need to store the results) ie. you're writing them down, you never need to use the clear key! Simply enter the numbers, do the operation, get the result. Next calculation the same thing - no clear key. With algebraic entry you must clear before you start a new calculation.

      
Re: Scientific calculators
Message #5 Posted by Ron Ross on 2 Nov 1999, 1:52 p.m.,
in response to message #1 by Bill Holmes

Your 42s is much more powerful than the 32s. Hp does not have a replacement for the 42s. Many Hp users would swap an Hp 48 for your working 42 if you ask around. The 32 has a very similiar key layout though not nearly as much RAM for programs.

      
Re: Scientific calculators
Message #6 Posted by Ron Ross on 3 Nov 1999, 5:59 a.m.,
in response to message #1 by Bill Holmes

One other solution if you can get by without trig functions is to purchase the hp17. It has 7K RAM and an easy hp solve to key in equations. It is RPN/algerbraic selectable and trig functions can be approxamated using taylor series expansions. It does not have hex, oct, bin conversions either and I have no easy get a round for this either. The hp 19 DOES have trig but is a hinged book type calc that doesn't seem as durable as the regular hp calcs. It also has some decent conversions available, no hex, bin either.


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